Sports Medicine Journal Reveals Our Childhood Coaches Tried To Kill Us

Remember when you were a kid and all your coaches and camp counselors and those vaguely hippie-ish guys who took your youth group hiking would tell you to drink, even when you weren’t thirsty? Turns out they were trying to murder you.

Source: Sports Medicine Journal Reveals Our Childhood Coaches Tried To Kill Us

I recommend reading one of my previous posts about trying to drink a gallon of water a day.  It has some interesting info about diagnosing the colour of your urine 😀

Four Myths About Hydration That Refuse To Die

As Derek Zoolander wisely put it, wetness is the essence of life. Whether you like drinking water or not, it accounts for about 60% of your body weight, and plays a pretty darn important role in making sure your body functions normally. But statistics aside, there are a couple of myths about hydration that refuse to die.

Source: Four Myths About Hydration That Refuse To Die

You can read about my experience looking into myth #1.  I have never attempted to drink that much water since.

The blurb about myth #3 does not mention skim milk or chocolate milk as a recovery drink.   Providing you’re not lactose intolerant or have ideological issues with drinking cows milk, it’s hydrating, provides carbs and protein, and a good source of calcium and vitamin D (necessary for processing calcium).

There is also an argument that diuretics (coffee, pop/soda) can be beneficial because they will encourage you to drink more when most aren’t motivated to drink more water.  They can be more enjoyable than water – certainly understandable in places where filtration can’t do enough for water.  Hard water tastes horrible…

How to Make Yourself Poop

How to be #1 in the #2 business:

On a perfect race morning, you’d wake up, have breakfast, and use the bathroom—at least once, maybe twice—and then head to your starting corral feeling great, not worrying whether you’ll have to stop along the way for an emergency Number 2.

But sometimes, your routine fails you. Maybe you’re traveling and in a different time zone, maybe your diet’s been a little off, or maybe you’ve just got a nervous stomach. But some mornings, you just can’t go, no matter how much you know it’s essential for a good run.

So what do you do now? We looked at the latest research, and talked with Felice Schnoll-Sussman, MD, a gastroenterologist at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University and a New York City marathon finisher, to find out. Here’s what science says about how to get yourself to go.

Source: How to Make Yourself Poop

Most think it’s the caffeine in coffee, but decaf works just the same.  No one wants to be immortalized like this guy, but it can be the defining moment to see how much you really want the result you trained for.  I already do some of what the article suggests – get up earlier, moving through the house as I get breakfast.  It depends, but often can feel like delayed reaction between when I got out of bed.

Teehee… backfire.

Why Women Need to Hydrate Differently Than Men

Coming off the heels of my Drink a Gallon Challenge:

When you work out, you sweat: That’s true no matter what your age, sex, or fitness level. Sweating is critical to keeping your body temp regulated, but with each drop of perspiration, you’re losing essential electrolytes and fluids that ensure your bod functions at its best. Lose too much and you may start to feel tired, dizzy, lightheaded, and achy. That’s dehydration.

Turns out, combating those fluid losses may not be a one-size-fits-all proposition.

Source: Why Women Need to Hydrate Differently Than Men

The article mentions sodium and potassium deficiency concerns, but not iron?  Regardless of gender, pay attention and investigate for yourself because overly broad (pun?) generalizations can be harmful.