The Myth of High-Protein Diets

MANY people have been making the case that Americans have grown fat because they eat too much starch and sugar, and not enough meat, fat and eggs. Recently, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee lifted recommendations that consumption of dietary cholesterol should be restricted, citing research that dietary cholesterol does not have a major effect on blood cholesterol levels. The predictable headlines followed: “Back to Eggs and Bacon?”

Source: The Myth of High-Protein Diets

These are not controlled studies.  While controlled studies provide better evidence, they are not feasible for all questions (in this case it would be impractical and unethical).  Results from observational studies like this one are not invalid, you just need to consider potential confounding, as they seem to have done here.  The study itself says that substituting fish, poultry, and nuts for red meat lowered the mortality risk.

This is no surprise coming from Dr. Dean Ornish, a longtime advocate of eating a plant-based diet. But his phrasing here surprises me. He seems to be suggesting that high protein in and of itself is bad, even if you’re getting your protein from low-calorie, low-fat sources like salmon.

Processed meats are so tightly linked to diabetes that we can inject rats with a compound from meat and cause diabetes. However, this is just processed meats we’re talking about. If you just cut some raw meat and then cook it, you’re mostly fine.

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