In Rodents Fed High-Fat Diets, Gut Microbes Boost Hunger, Trigger Obesity

After several hints that gut microbes may be key players in the obesity epidemic, a new study provides a mechanistic explanation of how the intestinal inhabitants directly induce hunger, insulin resistance, and ultimately obesity in rodents.

Source: In rodents fed high-fat diets, gut microbes boost hunger, trigger obesity

The percentage of fat in our diets (since the early 80s) has gone down, but protein stayed the same, and carbs have gone up to pick up the slack.

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Even More Evidence BMI Isn’t a Good Measure of Health

We already knew BMI isn’t a great measure of whether a person is fat or not, but now a study confirms that it’s not a good measure of health either.

Source: Even More Evidence BMI Isn’t a Good Measure of Health

It’s weird that BMI has stuck around so prominently. It’s a crude, blunt instrument that people think is precise. The only inputs in the equation are height and weight so it’s essentially meaningless.

‘Fat But Fit’ May Be A Myth

One of the most controversial ideas in medical science today is whether people can really be fat and fit. That is, is weight in itself a marker of health — or simply a suggestion of a person’s physical fitness?

Source: ‘Fat but fit’ may be a myth, researchers say

You’re probably wondering: Obviously it isn’t bad to work out, but is exercising while people are overweight an issue until there is fat loss? Is it not beneficial at first?

A lot of studies have indeed concluded that exercise is beneficial in terms of the later risk of disease. Physical activity have various positive effects on the body and it is most likely beneficial for individuals no matter their body fat percentage. However, analyzing fitness (as we have done) does not account for exercise that does not alter fitness level. Lastly, it is important to highlight the limitations of this study; it is merely an attempt to show an association, and the researchers did not intend to demonstrate causality. Further research is needed!

Sleeping In On Weekends Linked to Health Problems

Sleeping late on days-off—and other sleep-time adjustments—are linked to metabolic problems, including insulin resistance and a higher body mass index, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The finding suggests that regular sleep shifts could rouse long-term health problems such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, the authors conclude.

Though other research has connected sleep disruptions to poor health, the new study is the first to specifically link shifts in dozing times to metabolic problems. Those problems were independent of other factors such as sleep disorders, smoking, and socioeconomic status.

Source: Sleeping in on weekends linked to health problems

I don’t care if it shaves 5 years off my life. You can pry me early from my bed on Saturdays and Sundays when I’m dead (which again, may come early)! For anyone looking to avoid sleeping in on weekends, I suggest having small kids.  …or you could just go back to working all day, every day.

Quebec Strawberry has Potential to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Quebec may be known for maple syrup and poutine, but perhaps soon strawberries can be added to the list. A varietal known as the Authentic Orleans strawberry appears to help reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

Source: Quebec strawberry has potential to reduce Type 2 diabetes risk

Don’t go running out for strawberries just yet.  The findings are preliminary, but more fruit & veg is always a good idea.

Study: Increase Saturated Fat Food Does NOT Show Increase in Blood

Doubling or even nearly tripling saturated fat in the diet does not drive up total levels of saturated fat in the blood, according to a controlled diet study.

However, increasing levels of carbohydrates in the diet during the study promoted a steady increase in the blood of a fatty acid linked to an elevated risk for diabetes and heart disease.

The finding “challenges the conventional wisdom that has demonized saturated fat and extends our knowledge of why dietary saturated fat doesn’t correlate with disease,” said senior author Jeff Volek, a professor of human sciences at The Ohio State University.

Source: Study: Doubling Saturated Fat in the Diet Does Not Increase Saturated Fat in Blood

Emphasis is mine!  Not the first time with news that Low-Carb > Low-Fat diet.

“There is no magical carb level, no cookie-cutter approach to diet, that works for everyone,” he said. “There’s a lot of interest in personalized nutrition, and using a dynamically changing biomarker could provide some index as to how the body is processing carbohydrates.”