Why Hand Baskets and Reusable Bags May Make You Buy More Junk Food

You may not know it, but grocery stores cast very subtle spells on you to make you buy more junk. Your shopping behavior can even change whether you’re using a hand basket (versus a cart), or even if you bring your own reusable bag. Here’s why.

Source: Why Hand Baskets and Reusable Bags May Make You Buy More Junk Food

The customer’s path in the store was tracked with a personal digital 12 assistant, noting the time spent in the store and the shopping support used (cart or basket).

I wonder if they controlled for lifestyle factors. ie, a young, single person may be more likely to buy only a few groceries, use a handbasket, and buy more junk food. A married person, or someone with a family, may need to use a cart, and may get less junk food. In that case the difference is not the handbasket vs cart, it would be single vs not single.

Advertisements

How Much Do You Have to Workout to Burn Off the Junk Food You Eat?

If you want to be remotely healthy, don’t eat junk food. It’s that simple. Because it’s really not worth it (oh but it is, sometimes) when you try to burn off all those bad calories you just ate. Think about the exercise! Think about the weights! Think about the cardio! Think about all that when you’re about to eat a Big Mac and Fries because you need about an hour and a half of cardio or two hours of weights to whip that out your system.

Source: How much do you have to work out to burn off the junk food you eat?

Calorie counters do not combat sustenance, they combat gluttony.  We are inundated with so much food in our day-to-day lives that it’s hard to give our body exactly what it needs rather than overconsuming. Junk food is particularly good at supplying calories. If you let your body follow its own will, you’ll consume your daily allowance of calories easily. Even when you’re trying to control your calorie intake, we typically overconsume. We’re meant to eat as much as possible in the wild, when food was scarce and we ran 30 miles a day. Now it isn’t, we don’t, and our brains don’t quite get that…

If You Find Joy in Exercise, You’re Less Likely to Look for Joy in Food

It can be hard to love exercise, but there’s now more reason to start finding ways to enjoy it the same way you enjoy playing a video game, going shopping, or petting your dog. Why? Because doing so could help you make more healthier food choices.

Source: If You Find Joy in Exercise, You’re Less Likely to Look for Joy in Food

I still enjoy food, I’m just more mindful of portioning/portion control though.  And I do try to pick better things if possible.

The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food

…A chemist by training with a doctoral degree in food science, Behnke became Pillsbury’s chief technical officer in 1979 and was instrumental in creating a long line of hit products, including microwaveable popcorn. He deeply admired Pillsbury but in recent years had grown troubled by pictures of obese children suffering from diabetes and the earliest signs of hypertension and heart disease. In the months leading up to the C.E.O. meeting, he was engaged in conversation with a group of food-science experts who were painting an increasingly grim picture of the public’s ability to cope with the industry’s formulations — from the body’s fragile controls on overeating to the hidden power of some processed foods to make people feel hungrier still. It was time, he and a handful of others felt, to warn the C.E.O.’s that their companies may have gone too far in creating and marketing products that posed the greatest health concerns.

Source: The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food

It’s an incredibly long read about the various ways the food industry worked to make products more appealing.  The “vanishing caloric deficit” is said to be present in Coca-cola, that you can drink lots without feeling full.  That’s besides the desire to have more…

Do Mini-Packaged Snacks Really Help You Eat Less Junk?

In recent years countless food manufacturers have been “sub-packaging” their foods into smaller portions in an apparent effort to curb folks from overindulging. You can usually find 100 kcal multi-packs of chips, pretzels, chocolates, and all sorts of junk foods. Despite the very obvious negative environmental impact of all this excess packaging, what, if any, impact does such packaging have on people’s consumption.

Source: Do Mini-Packaged Snacks Really Help You Eat Less Junk?

42 people is bigger (no pun, I swear) than some studies, but still not terribly huge…

My take is that most will treat themselves to more small packages under the impression that the caloric intake is not cumulative.

Some Food Labels Could Be Overestimating Calorie Counts

The method most commonly used to assess the number of calories in foods is flawed, overestimating the energy provided to the body by proteins, nuts and foods high in fiber by as much as 25 percent, some nutrition experts say.

“The amount of calories a person gets from protein and fiber are overstated,” said Geoffrey Livesey, the head of Independent Nutrition Logic, a nutrition consulting company in Britain, and a nutrition consultant to the United Nations. “This is especially misleading for those on a high-protein, high-fiber diet, or for diabetics” who must limit their intake of carbohydrates.

An adult aiming to take in 2,000 calories a day on a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet may actually be consuming several hundred calories less, he and other experts said. Calorie estimates for junk foods, particularly processed carbohydrates, are more accurate.

Source: On Food Labels, Calorie Miscounts

Part of the problem is that calories are traditionally measured by burning food and measuring how much energy it takes to get the food to boil water (basically, it operates under the assumption humans are steam engines).

There’s been scientific papers for years pointing out that calorie counts are not accurate, and that even relying on them for any measure of health even when they are accurate may be completely irrelevant to human health.

(Only) Two Rules for a Good Diet

Yet every day I’m asked, “How do I know that what I’m buying is O.K.?” It seems the better educated and more concerned people are about this, the more confused they are. Drill deep enough and the list to worry about becomes overwhelming: organics, genetically modified organisms, carbon footprint, packaging, fair trade, waste, labor, animal welfare and for all I know the quality of the water that’s being used to wash your organic greens.

Source: (Only) Two Rules for a Good Diet

It’s very similar to a previous post: Most Diets Boil Down to: Eat More Vegetables