Fat or Stupid? Study Say You Must Choose

A surprising study contradicting all previous research found that being fat in middle age appears to cut the risk of developing dementia rather than increase it, the Lancet scientific journal has reported.

A study of two million people found that the underweight were far more likely to develop dementia, a growing problem among the elderly in the Western world.

Underweight people had a 34 percent higher risk of developing dementia than those of a normal weight, the study found, while the very obese had a 29 percent lower risk of becoming forgetful and confused and showing other signs of senility.

Source: Being fat in middle age reduces risk of developing dementia, researchers say

Obesity or dementia? Superficial outward beauty accompanied by the brain of a mouse, or a healthy mind that shall not know happiness due to the cruel world’s shallow condemnation of your size? Total satisfaction is as impossible as squeezing a slippery water balloon—whichever side you get a solid grasp on will only cause the opposite side to swell in grotesque proportion.

There is some belief that dementia may be caused by a lack of myelin (fatty substance) covering the meninges in the brain/CNS. I think it’s also true that children with a certain degenerative brain disease (can’t remember what it’s called) are told to eat a ketogenic diet (fatty foods, specifically olive oil) to slow the destruction of the myelin and therefore the meninges.

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Bacon Can Power You Through A Marathon

Most people who exercise or compete in endurance sports would probably answer no. For decades, recreational and competitive athletes have stoutly believed that we should — even must — consume a diet rich in carbohydrates to fuel exertion. The conventional wisdom has been to avoid fatty foods because they are an inefficient fuel source and could lead to weight gain.

But in recent years, some scientists and quite a few athletes have begun to question those beliefs. Athletes devoted to ultra-endurance sports, in particular, tout high-fat diets as a means to improve performance.

…exercise scientists long ago established that endurance training makes athletes better able to use fat as a fuel. And that metabolic adaptation prompted many scientists and coaches in recent years to wonder what would happen if you extended that ability to its farthest extreme and trained an athlete’s body to rely almost exclusively on fat, by removing almost all carbohydrates from the diet and ramping up grease intake?

Source: Should Athletes Eat Fat or Carbs?

If you decide to make a change – do it in the off season.  It may take a few weeks for your body to adapt to a high-fat diet (three weeks for cyclists in one of the studies), and it may never work well if you’re doing sports that require sudden bursts of power or strength, like weightlifting, Crossfit, or team sports like American football. But if you’re gearing up for a marathon or a long bike race, bacon-heavy breakfasts might suit you just fine.

For vegans/vegetarians, you’ll want to source fat from the following:

  • Avocados
  • Cheese (assuming not vegan/etc and/or lactose intolerant)
  • Nuts (assuming no allergies)

Century-old Drug Reverses Autism-like Symptoms in Fragile X Mouse Model

Researchers previously reported that a drug used for almost a century to treat trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, reversed environmental autism-like symptoms in mice. Now, a new study suggests that a genetic form of autism-like symptoms in mice are also corrected with the drug, even when treatment was started in young adult mice.

Source: Century-old drug reverses autism-like symptoms in fragile X mouse model

  1. Suramin is not a drug that can be used for more than a few months without a risk of toxicity in humans.
  2. The effect is not permanent. The experimental mice’s autistic behaviours come back once the suramin has disappeared from their bodies. But these are interesting results.

For a very long time now, scientists have viewed Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) as a cellular/genetic disorder and relatively recently researchers are now appreciating neuroimmunology as a whole. However, neuroimmunology is still a difficult field to work in, for a variety of reasons, so there is still a lot of potential in the near and distant future. The genetic, molecular, cellular, systems-level perturbations that lead to ASD do in fact underlie every mental disorder. The two are not mutually exclusive and in fact are dependent on one another.

For those who have ASD, or know someone who does, there’s research to suggest it’s worth considering ketogenic diet.  I’d first heard of the ketogenic diet being good for epileptics.