You Can Train Your Body Into Thinking It’s Had Medicine

The results were part of a well-known and seemingly mundane phenomenon that has been driving a quiet revolution in immunology. Its proponents hope that by cutting drug doses, it will not only minimise harmful side-effects but also slash billions from healthcare costs, transforming treatment for conditions such as autoimmune disorders and cancer. The secret? Teaching your body how to respond to a particular medicine, so that in future it can trigger the same change on its own.

Source: You can train your body into thinking it’s had medicine

This is at least a second cup kind of article, so I’ll be back because I’m curious if the effect is transferable.

Clinically, placebos been at least 50% as effective as real drugs.  But this is more than just a mere placebo effect. It’s a true form of conditioning the body’s response.  It creates a trigger based on sensations and memory whether the patient knows what they are taking is the real medicine or not. Placebos mimic medicine from the beginning and works more effectively if the patient is fooled into thinking it works. No deception is required here.

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Husband Saves Wife’s Life by Donating Kidney After Dieting and Exercising to get his Blood Pressure Low Enough for Surgery

In sickness and in health 🙂

A man has spent a year losing 70lbs so he could donate his kidney to his wife.

PJ Spraggins was delighted when he discovered he was a perfect match for wife Tracy, who was told her life-long battle with Lupus would kill her if she didn’t get a transplant. The waiting list is seven years long.

Source: Husband saves wife’s life by donating kidney after spending a year dieting and exercising to get his blood pressure low enough for surgery

Probably saved his life too.

Scientists Grow Functional Kidney Organoid from Stem Cells

There are many diseases that attack specific organs, landing patients on a transplant list. Unfortunately, our bodies have markers that identify an organ as “self,” which makes it difficult to find an organ match. Many individuals die waiting for an organ transplant because a match can’t be found.

Source: Scientists grow functional kidney organoid from stem cells

The shortage of organ donors has always bothered me. I feel like organ donation should be opt out, not opt in. Still, with advances like this, maybe it won’t be necessary at all in the future.

Sports Medicine Journal Reveals Our Childhood Coaches Tried To Kill Us

Remember when you were a kid and all your coaches and camp counselors and those vaguely hippie-ish guys who took your youth group hiking would tell you to drink, even when you weren’t thirsty? Turns out they were trying to murder you.

Source: Sports Medicine Journal Reveals Our Childhood Coaches Tried To Kill Us

I recommend reading one of my previous posts about trying to drink a gallon of water a day.  It has some interesting info about diagnosing the colour of your urine 😀

8 Things That Happen When You Finally Stop Drinking Diet Soda

You’ve decided to give up diet soda—good idea! Maybe you weren’t hitting your weight-loss goals or couldn’t stomach that long list of ingredients anymore. Or perhaps you heard one too many times that it’s just not good for you.

Whatever the reason, eliminating diet soda from your diet will improve your health from head to toe. Research on diet soda is still in its infancy, but there’s enough out there to identify what you can look forward to when you put down the can and cool down with an unsweetened iced tea instead.

Source: 8 Things That Happen When You Finally Stop Drinking Diet Soda

Sorry, but soda/pop is one place I will not consider the diet alternative.  Simply due to taste – most just prompted me to drink water instead (for the best anyway, but not for Big Soda/Pop).

The aspect of weight loss because of coming off diet soda/pop isn’t that surprising.  It’s often suggested that we consume more because we’re under the impression the food/beverage is healthier so we can consume more. As the joke goes: I’ll have the extra large burger, extra large fries, and …a diet soft drink.

As They Lay Dying: Terminally Ill and Organ Donation

…W.B.’s life was turned upside down by the diagnosis. But once the initial shock passed, he began researching his condition intensively. He learned that he was unlikely to survive five years, and that in the meantime his quality of life would diminish dramatically. With limited options, many patients retreat. But, quite bravely, W.B. had other ideas. After much consideration, he decided that if he was going to die, he would like to try to save another person’s life in the process, even if that person was a stranger. And so last May he approached the University of Wisconsin’s transplant program, where we are surgeons, as a prospective organ donor.

…From the earliest days of transplantation, surgeons subscribed to an informal ethical norm known as the “dead-donor rule,” holding that organ procurement should not cause a donor’s death. In practice, this meant waiting until patients were by all measures completely dead—no heartbeat, no blood pressure, no respiration—to remove any vital organs. Unfortunately, few organs were still transplantable by this point, and those that were transplanted tended to have poor outcomes by today’s standards.

Source: As They Lay Dying

The medicine, the US in this article particularly, operates in a strange paradox – we uphold the right to patient autonomy in nearly every situation… Except when an otherwise (legally) competent individual chooses a care option that involves the outcome of death/disability by intervention. Physician-aid-in-dying and this particular case are examples of decisions made by terminally-ill people where we interfere with their right to self-determination.

I don’t stand on a political soapbox – everyone gets an opinion and a vote – but rather an ethical one.

If we can not cure, what are the boundaries of what we do to palliate? What if we are able to simultaneously palliate (psychologically or physically) one patient, while providing an invaluable service to another? Is it truly against the spirit of the Hippocratic oath to provide psychologically and spiritually meaningful interventions at the expense of the physical body?

I personally am of the mind that if the patient and physician enter into a trusting and respectful relationship, that these questions can only be answered/defined within the context of that particular relationship.

Kidney Transplants Don’t Necessarily Mean the Old/Bad One is Removed

Your native kidneys are in the back – the new kidney is put in the front. The artery and vein on the kidney are usually connected into the main artery and vein in the front right groin (ileacs), and the ureter is patched on the side or top of the bladder. The old/diseased kidney stays usually connected.

Meet the new boss, same as the old boss

See for yourself

Why?  Old/diseased kidneys aren’t typically removed because they still work. They can still filter blood, but at maybe up 10-20% of what healthy kidneys can do. A donated kidney can do upwards of 50%, assuming the transplant works perfectly.  Then factor in the additional time and resources for surgery to remove the old/diseased kidney(s), which increases the chance that something goes wrong.

That’s not to say this is always the case.  Kidneys can increase in size for a variety of reasons, so removal might be necessary to make room.  There are also cases where transplanted kidney(s) have failed, but there was no room so removal would have to be done first.

What about the Donor?  Could the Empty Space Hold My Valuables?

Have you considered a career as a drug mule?

When you donate a kidney, your existing kidney increases size to compensate for the loss and all your other organs shift to fill the void.  On average, the remaining kidney increases to 1.5 times the original size within months of donation.

What’s an Auto Transplant?

Auto transplant is for pain that can’t be fixed, so they basically cut it out to remove all the nerves and then put it back in again.  You are your own donor…  I’d suggest changing your name to “Ship of Theseus“.

I organ donation

I organ donation