Roast Your Lemons First for Delicious, Flavorful Lemonade

It’s time to rethink the way you do lemonade. Before you squeeze a bag of lemons for a pitcher of that cool and refreshing drink, I suggest you first turn up the heat.

Source: How the Oven Will Help You Make Even Better Lemonade

This looks fantastic, AND CALLS FOR RUM.  …But why is the rum always GONE?

I had some phenomenal lemonade at a party last week. The delightfully surprising ingredient was rose water. It gave it quite a unique enhanced flavor.

Lemon Rinds and Sugar Are All You Need to Make Fresh Lemon Syrup

I am a notorious cheapskate.

I started my first restaurant job at 14, and, by 18, the Book of Yields was my grimoire. I learned how to stop profits from vanishing into thin air, how to maximize every return. If you’re in this industry long enough, battling food cost simply becomes a way of life. Particularly in the realm of pastry, where wildly expensive necessities often break the curve—fresh cream and butter, imported chocolate and vanilla, flats of local eggs and fat spring strawberries.

Which is how I stumbled into the habit of making fresh lemon syrup from leftover lemon rinds, just the sort of thing a penny-pinching pastry chef would come up with at home. Home, because in my restaurant days, I’d always zest my lemons before juicing, or else carefully peel them for candy, so I never felt too bad about pitching the pithy rinds. But, living outside the pastry dungeon, my resentment of having to pay retail for citrus has grown to an all-time high, while my need for candied peel has hit an all-time low.

Source: Stop Throwing Lemon Rinds Away! Make This No-Cook Syrup Instead

Throw them in a jar with a couple cups of sugar, leave sit in sun till you have lemon syrup, add water, add dark jamaican rum, sit in your hammock and stop giving a shit for a few hours.

I wish I knew of this when I was zesting lemons for limoncello…

Use Coffee Instead of Water in Your Batter for a Rich, Flavorful Cake

Whatever your stance on cake mixes, you can agree on one thing: they can always stand a little improvement. Thankfully, mixes are incredibly easy to soup up; substitute an ingredient here or add an ingredient there, and you’ll have all the flavor of a homemade cake, with all the ease of a boxed mix. Here are eight awesome ways to make your boxed cake mix taste homemade.

Source: 8 Tricks That Make Boxed Taste Like Homemade

Please warn those to whom you serve the cake that you put coffee in it. It’s a rare sensitivity, but coffee really does make some sick.

How to Enjoy These Exciting Citrus Before They’re Out of Season

Citrus fruit may taste like sunshine, but the colder months of the year are when the happy tasting delights are in season. You’re surely familiar with oranges, lemons, limes, and grapefruits, but what about blood oranges or Buddha’s hand? There are a ton of more interesting specimens available, and these are some of the best.

Source: How to Enjoy These Exciting Citrus Before They’re Out of Season

No love for carambola (star fruit)? I suppose it isn’t technically a citrus plant. But they’re so damn tasty…

Make This Tangy Citrus Dessert With a Simple Ratio

Citrus fruits, like all the orange varieties, grapefruits, lemons, and limes, truly are winter’s shining stars. With varying degrees of sweetness, tart, tang, and bitterness, these bright fruits have a knack for brightening winter’s coldest days.

Of course, you can eat them out of hand, or turn them into cocktails, vinaigrettes, and baked goods, but one of the very best ways to put that citrus to work right now is by making a sweet and tangy curd.

Source: Your Template for Sweet and Tangy Citrus Curd, 5 Ways

Curd will last five days in the fridge, but three months in the freezer.

Banish Fridge Funk with a Cotton Ball and Vanilla Extract

We’re not too proud to admit that sometimes our kitchens can get a little…funky. From blackberry caramel sauce to soy-glazed chicken thighs to homemade ramen, sometimes even the most intoxicating scents can linger. After a day or two of “Hey, what’s that smell?” we realize that somewhere along the way, last night’s dinner has become today’s awful stench.

And hey: There’s no shame in admitting we’ve got a problem. It’s all in how you handle it. We here at Bon Appétit prefer to take care of business the old-fashioned way. Sure, harsh chemicals might work in cleaning up a mess, but they leave behind a scent that, in our opinion, can be just as bad as that questionable kimchi. So we rounded up our best folk remedies for ridding your kitchen of even the weirdest, worst smells. Here are our favorites…

Source: How to Get Rid of Kitchen Smells with Natural Remedies

Is it embarrassing to admit that 90 percent of the time taking out the trash fixes the problem? 😉

Don’t try the cotton balls/vanilla extract anywhere near your ice maker, or all ice will have a little bit of vanilla extract in it.

A Foolproof 5-Ingredient Ice Cream, No Cooking Required

A spectacular summer ice cream recipe with just two steps and five ingredients.

…while most recipeswith or without eggsrequire some cooking, today’s creamy blackberry lemon ice cream does not. Instead, it relies on sweetened condensed milk to thicken the mixture.

Source: Only 2 Steps and 5 Ingredients Stand Between You and This Ice Cream

Summer ice cream?  Ice cream is always in season.

Couple of points to be made:

  1. The recipe calls for half-and-half – effectively off limits for lactose intolerant, and depending on strictness – vegetarianism.  There is vitamin K in half-and-half too – we don’t get out unscathed either.
  2. Evaporated milk is not condensed milk.  Or, I need to find a recipe that uses evaporated milk… 😉
  3. All traditional ice cream has a custard base (cream, milk, sugar, and egg yolks). For more information on that, see this NYTimes article.  The difference between frozen custard and ice cream is mainly two things (and one of them is not a non-custard base): 1) milk fat percentage; and 2) serving temperature.

Remove Odors from Your Entire Home by Simmering Vinegar

Some of our favorite tips in the kitchen are for getting it sparkling clean; these are their stories.

Source: 7 Kitchen Cleaning Tricks That Really Work

The fruit fly one is interesting.  …Not that I have a need for it… 😉

How/why does this work? What does the vinegar do?

Vinegar is about 90% water, and about 5-10% acetic acid.  Most scented molecules contain a functional group like an amine (putrescine, for example, one of the rotting smells), a thiol (ethanethiol, i.e. skunk smell), or other non-carbon molecules. Acetic acid can bind these to form molecules that your nose can not detect, thus eliminating the odor. Even if it’s not forming an actual chemical bond, it can still coordinate (i.e. form hydrogen bonds, which are pretty strong themselves. It’s analogous to dissolving.) thus removing the scented molecules from the air, woodwork, carpet, etc.

Take Your Marinara Sauce to the Next Level With a Little Lemon Zest

With one ingredient, make your marinara taste like the best tomatoes on earth.

Source: A Genius Trick for Brighter Marinara Sauce

I have refresher for those that need it: Difference between Citrus Zest, Peel and Rind

A little lemon zest does wonders for chicken gravy too. That and black pepper. For those that are into that sort of thing… 😉

Easily Upgrade Leftovers With a Simple Pan Sauce Recipe

Your pan should already have a tablespoon or so of fat in it (leftover from browning your meat); if it doesn’t, supplement with olive oil. Now add an aromatic or two to the pan: A couple of smashed garlic cloves or a sliced shallot; a sturdy fresh herb, like thyme or rosemary. Give them a few minutes over gentle heat so they release their flavors.

Source: How to Make a Simple Pan Sauce

This is essentially making a gravy for your leftovers, which is a straightforward enough idea, but I like that this recipe is so simple and quick, and you can make it straight from the pan after reheating left over food.