How the ISS Astronauts Grew Their Space Lettuce

Interesting to see what microgravity teaches us about agriculture!

Don’t know why they use the word “microgravity”?  If it’s in orbit, the effects of gravity have to be zero by definition… Because there is no such thing as “zero gravity”!  There’s gravity from the sun all the way out here, it’s really more like no relative acceleration.  As in microgravity, you’re actually in perpetual free fall.

Lettuce Is the Bottled Water of Produce

Another day, another story about what we should consume when confronted with a water-scarce future. On today’s chopping block: Lettuce, should you eat it? Let us begin with this provocative statement: A head of iceberg contains the same amount of water as a bottle of Evian, it’s wrapped in lots of plastic, and shipping it around the world is just as awful for the environment.

Source: Lettuce Is the Bottled Water of Produce

The darker the green, the more nutritious it is. This holds true all the way up until Kale, which is wholly inedible and not fit for human consumption. You will actually lose calories eating it, because uncontrollable vomiting is an energy intensive activity.

There Are Strawberries Growing Underwater Off the Coast of Italy

The air of the greenhouse stands at 79 degrees with humidity hovering around 83 percent. That’s a pretty good environment for a typical plant.

But this is no ordinary greenhouse: It’s 20 feet under water, anchored to the floor of the sea just off the coast of Noli, Italy.

Source: The world’s most beautiful greenhouses are underwater, and growing strawberries

The artificial reef aspect is nothing new – it’s been documented about oil rigs. But it’s all fun and games until the octopus discovers how good strawberries are…

The climate will be an issue, and size to make a proper yield.  But otherwise I figure that it makes for use of space without interference from the elements, animals, insects, etc.

Four Vegetables You Can Regrow on a Windowsill to Use Again Every Week

…the wonders of the kitchen don’t stop once you’ve finished cooking: Even once you’ve used however many scallions—or carrots or fennel fronds—as you need in a recipe, the others needn’t go in the compost. They can last a long time. A really long time. You just need to regrow them and—here’s another miraculous part—it only takes one week.

Here are four vegetables that only need one week of water and sunshine to regrow to a point where you can use them. You should change the water when it gets cloudy, but otherwise, this method requires barely any effort. Just chop, regrow, repeat:

Source: Use, Regrow, Repeat: 4 Vegetables that Regrow in One Week

Now for the bad news – they’re all foods/ingredients high in vitamin K:

If you’re on blood thinners – grow them, but give the majority to others.