A Recipe for Your Hangover Michelada That’s Impossible to Screw Up

It’s morning. Probably. You’re disoriented, the inside of your mouth has been replaced by ass-flavored shellac, and somehow it’s 87 degrees at 10 a.m. The full weight of last night will soon come rushing back to you, and you need enough hair of the dog to qualify as taxidermy in order to steel yourself against the impending nausea.

Source: A Recipe for Your Hangover Michelada That’s Impossible to Screw Up

You’re probably thinking “All you need is bloody mary mix, and a beer”…

Bloody Mary mix will work in a pinch, but “all you need” is a stretch. That’s sort of like saying that cooking dinner is a waste of time because Hungry Man salisbury steaks exist.

Make a Refreshing Michelada Right In Your Beer Can

Micheladas are not a challenging thing: Pour beer into a glass, shake in some hot sauce or sauces, squeeze in a lime, salt well. Everyone has their own way of doing it, their own set of ratios, their own sauce. I make mine in a can.

Source: The Mixed Drink You Can Make Right in the Beer Can

To makes things even easier, start with a beer that is already mixed with tomato juice (Sol makes one). I’m really not a fan of the Michelada, but I’ve seen people make them the way you describe starting with the tomatoey beer.

How to Enjoy These Exciting Citrus Before They’re Out of Season

Citrus fruit may taste like sunshine, but the colder months of the year are when the happy tasting delights are in season. You’re surely familiar with oranges, lemons, limes, and grapefruits, but what about blood oranges or Buddha’s hand? There are a ton of more interesting specimens available, and these are some of the best.

Source: How to Enjoy These Exciting Citrus Before They’re Out of Season

No love for carambola (star fruit)? I suppose it isn’t technically a citrus plant. But they’re so damn tasty…

Make This Tangy Citrus Dessert With a Simple Ratio

Citrus fruits, like all the orange varieties, grapefruits, lemons, and limes, truly are winter’s shining stars. With varying degrees of sweetness, tart, tang, and bitterness, these bright fruits have a knack for brightening winter’s coldest days.

Of course, you can eat them out of hand, or turn them into cocktails, vinaigrettes, and baked goods, but one of the very best ways to put that citrus to work right now is by making a sweet and tangy curd.

Source: Your Template for Sweet and Tangy Citrus Curd, 5 Ways

Curd will last five days in the fridge, but three months in the freezer.

Stop Trying to Squeeze Out All the Lime Juice. Over-Squeezing Leads to Bitterness

When squeezing citrus juice, you probably try to get the most juice out so as to not waste money or the fruit. However, there’s a culinary reason you might want to squeeze only almost all the way: to avoid too much bitterness.

Source: Stop Trying to Squeeze Out All the Lime Juice. Over-Squeezing Leads to Bitterness

Over-squeezing leads to bitterness… Bitterness leads to hate… Hate leads to the Dark Side.

Come to the Dark Side… we have cookies.

Relieve Itchy Mosquito Bites with Fresh Lemon or Lime Juice

Unwelcome critters, whether in your cabinets or on your tomato vines, are a common woe. We rounded up the best tips from the internet and tested them to see which actually work.

Source: Myth or Magic? 16 Pest Control Hacks We Tested for You

Direct sunlight on lime juice causes severe burning and blistering of the skin, which may require an ER visit. I won’t post gross pics but feel free to Google!  If you are applying lime juice to your skin, it should only be done if they are inside for the day.

This Is What They’re Doing With Their Expired Food in Sweden

When you toss manky lettuce or moldy berries think about this: Globally, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization, we waste more than a third of the food we produce.

To combat that, a group of Swedish graduate students in the Food Innovation and Product Design program at Lund University have come up with a way to use produce that is about to go to waste—and to help people who have limited access to food.

Source: Swedish Designers Are Turning Fruits and Veggies Into a Nonperishable Powder

It’s been a while, but the inexact science of “expired food” has been covered in the past.  At first I was thinking that for the volume of food compared to the need for humanitarian aid, it wouldn’t be long before supply outstrips demand.  Also, the article doesn’t mention shelf life of the powder… The local food shelters could stand to benefit.  A lot of people contribute food to shelters, but they also need things like toiletries.

Method of transport would be the next hurdle, but considering that food powder is less size and weight (without the need for refrigeration/etc either)… there’d still be a cost, but substantially less than whole food.  I would have thought this to be astronaut food, but there’s no mention.