Don’t Worry About the “Gender” of Your Nutrition Bars

You can’t escape nutrition bars.

The foodstuff—that doesn’t quite look like food—lines grocery store shelves, fills office kitchen drawers, and hides squished at the bottom of backpacks and purses, preemptive strikes against future hunger emergencies. Not all bars are created equal, of course. “Protein bars” place emphasis on muscle building. “Energy bars” hone in on the concept of food as fuel, the snack to tide you over between meals. And “nutrition bars” target “health and weight-conscious consumers”—veiled language for the belief that nutrition bars are supposed to be for women.

Source: The Stereotype-Driven Business of Selling Nutrition Bars to Women

So basically the same thing as every other “For X gender” product ever?  Gotcha.  Men’s chapstick is brilliant – it comes in a flat tube to fit in the pocket better.  Because they don’t carry purses…

It’s not about the gender of the marketing – try it for yourself to determine if it works for you.  There’s no absolute rule for nutrition in triathlon because everybody is different.  Even within gender.

Coca-Cola is a Healthy Snack? How Company Promotes that Message

If a column in honor of heart health suggests a can of Coke as a snack, you might want to read the fine print.

The world’s biggest beverage maker, which struggles with declining soda consumption in the U.S., is working with fitness and nutrition experts who suggest its cola as a healthy treat. In February, for instance, several wrote online pieces for American Heart Month, with each including a mini-can of Coke or small soda as a snack idea.

Source: Coke is a healthy snack: How company pays to get out that message

I don’t think anyone out there is fooled by the advertisement.  If they read it at all…  I had encountered an article suggesting that soda/pop could be considered hydrating because it is designed to make you drink more of it.  And it is a diuretic, so there is some credence to flushing your system.  But there’s other things to consider:

A Weird Neuroscientific Explanation for Why We Love Cheetos

Orange cheese dust. That wholly unnatural neon stuff that gloms onto your fingers when you’re mindlessly snacking on chips or doodles. The stuff you don’t think about until you realize you’ve smeared it on your shirt or couch cushions—and then keep on eating anyway, despite your better intentions. Orange cheese dust is probably not the first thing you think of when talking about how the brain functions, but it’s exactly the kind of thing that makes NeuroFocus, and neuromarketing in general, such a potentially huge and growing business. In 2008, Frito-Lay hired NeuroFocus to look into Cheetos, the junk-food staple. After scanning the brains of a carefully chosen group of consumers, the NeuroFocus team discovered that the icky coating triggers an unusually powerful response in the brain: a sense of giddy subversion that consumers enjoy over the messiness of the product. In other words, the sticky stuff is what makes those snacks such a sticky brand. Frito-Lay leveraged that information into its advertising campaign for Cheetos, which has made the most of the mess. For its efforts, NeuroFocus earned a Grand Ogilvy award for advertising research, given out by the Advertising Research Foundation, for “demonstrating the most successful use of research in the creation of superior advertising that achieves a critical business objective.”

Source: NeuroFocus Uses Neuromarketing To Hack Your Brain

A lengthly but interesting read about MRI and EEG testing to determine what we really desire.  They don’t seem to know why, only that the dopamine must flow.