Why Do We Have Standard Eating Times (IE Breakfast, Lunch)?

Back in the day, every single meal had to be prepared from scratch. To feed large families, staff and/or communities more effectively there was division of labour.  A few people cook, others do different work and show up at given times to eat together.

A proper schedule is essential when many people have to physically live and work together in the same space and time.  It has nothing to do with biology, and everything to do with economics and practicality.  Also, don’t forget the benefits of the bonding that takes place when people gather for a meal. It makes for a stronger family/community.

Imagine a tribe where everyone ate at random, different times. Nothing would ever get done. Imagine a job that takes two people such as pulling a felled tree through the forest. You’re pulling it back to the tribe. Suddenly the other person decides he is hungry and goes and eats. You sit down for an hour and he gets back. You pull the tree some more then now you’re hungry. He sits down for another hour while you go off to get food.

You can see how this changes from region to region. Different places can have different appropriate times for lunch or dinner.  In Chile I’d have lunch at 1-2, but in Mexico most people have it at around 3-4, while in Canada I see them eat at noon. It’s not weird, but those times can be dictated by environment – the closer to the equator, the less likely things will be happening at noon.   Your job would also be a big factor; miners would probably just eat whenever they were hungry as there’s no sun to follow and timekeeping methods would be expensive to use (e.g candle clocks) while sailors would probably eat whenever they weren’t busy with other time sensitive jobs (e.g. fishing).  But it’s the industrial revolution and the mechanization of society that cemented concrete times for meals based on breaks and start/ends of shifts.

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Here is How Dinner Changed Over the Last 100 Years

At three minutes long, it’s not going to show a lot.  There’s no narration either.

Though it’s only one meal per time period, 1915 suggests the simplicity due to probably both resources (food and kitchen).  The TV dinner makes an appearance, and towards the end – multiculturalism becomes apparent with tacos and sushi after that.  We’ve known for a while about tortillas and salsa are outselling previously popular fast food like burgers

Plan Your Cheat Meals with a “Risk vs. Reward” Mindset

“Everything in moderation,” they say, but how much is moderation exactly? One donut a day, or a dozen over a week? Instead of relying on an overused, vague mantra, look at decisions to “cheat on your diet” in terms of risk versus reward to make better judgment calls on “treating yo’self!”

Source: Plan Your Cheat Meals with a “Risk vs. Reward” Mindset

Choose wisely in social situations.  I still get grief about my eating choice because I turned down donuts.  Pastries in general are not a good idea for my cholesterol, but even knowing that – people still manage to take things personally.

When It Makes Sense to Add Extra Fat to Your Meal

Now that fat is overcoming its bad reputation, it’s becoming trendy to add it to food and drinks for health reasons—whether that’s putting butter in your coffee for dubious benefits, or swapping “Lite” salad dressing for a drizzle of bacon grease. But when does adding fat make sense, and when is it a bad idea?

Source: When It Makes Sense to Add Extra Fat to Your Meal

I was glad to see the article talk about how we’ve come to know that fat intake increases our uptake of fat soluble vitamins.  There is most certainly nutritional value in having fat in our diet.

Create a Custom Weight Loss Meal Plan in Four Steps

Fat loss, dieting, getting shredded, leaning out, weight loss — whatever you want to call it, it’s all the same end-result. More muscle, less fat, better definition is what we all want.

One question I get all the time is “can you give me a meal plan for weight loss?” And to that, I always respond with a ‘no’ for two reasons:

  • It’s technically illegal for me to give someone a fully-detailed weight loss meal plan because I’m not a registered dietician.
  • It doesn’t actually teach you anything. (Like, why go through the trouble and frustration that can be this physique-building journey and not actually learn anything?)

Today we’re talking all about weight loss. Meal plans, just like any other time you need a plan, are pertinent to your success when it comes to losing fat, getting lean, and staying that way.

Source: How To Build Your Weight Loss Meal Plans And Make Losing Fat Easier On Yourself

The article is quite comprehensive – it’s not a quick read.

The whole conversation around weight loss and diet is nuanced, complicated, and not easily parsed. All you’ll get are personal testimonials and I’ve discovered that the only thing that’s worked for me is to figure out what worked for me.  But I keep compiling the various articles to glean what I can from them to improve.

How Famous Artists Would Plate Thanksgiving Meals

In time for the holidays, artist Hannah Rothstein has taken pictures of a Thanksgiving meal – plated by various well known artists. She’s selling them, and 10 percent of the proceeds will go to the SF-Marin Food Bank.  The following is Piet Mondrian:
Piet Mondrian
I got the Pollack one.

Freezer: Food Graveyard for Younger Cooks?

Young shoppers do not like eating food that is stored in the freezer, a survey has found. Why is it so unpopular, asks Luke Jones.  Those younger than 34 were twice as likely to say they did not like eating food from the freezer as those over 35, according to the survey.

Freezer cookbooks were once a must-have kitchen item, but for younger cooks the freezer is a “graveyard” where bad and forgotten meals sit and frost over. Meat that is about to go off, unwanted food from relatives and emergency last resort meals are its only stock.

Source: Why has the freezer become a food graveyard for younger cooks?

The insta-meal is alluring…