Brains of People With Schizophrenia Try to Repair Themselves: Study

Schizophrenia is a mysterious, misunderstood mental illness without a full cure. However, researchers from the United Kingdom and China may have found a clue that could help to understand it better.

Source: Brains of People With Schizophrenia Try to Repair Themselves: Study

The human brain produces 500,000 to 1,000,000 new brain cells daily, which has been known for years. These cells migrate throughout the brain and repair damaged areas by replacing lost cells. There’s a hypothesis on the etiology of schizophrenia and all of the autism spectrum disorders is neurotoxicity from the stress hormone cortisol during early pregnancy, when cortisol is known to pass the placental barrier and when important neural modules are developing, or not.

New App Aims to Help Researchers Look for a Genetic Link to Postpartum Depression

With mothers and medical providers clamoring for answers about postpartum depression, scientists are beginning a major effort to understand the genetic underpinnings of mood disorders that afflict millions of women during and after pregnancy.

Source: Hunting the Genetic Signs of Postpartum Depression With an iPhone App

Women with high scores will be asked if they’d like to submit a DNA sample to researchers at UNC. If users agree, they will be mailed an oral kit. Researchers assured the Times that even though personal information like name and address are required, that data will be encrypted in order to preserve privacy.

How Crickets Help Explain One of Schizophrenia’s Biggest Mysteries

For a long time, people with schizophrenia have reported feeling as though their thoughts and actions were controlled by an outside influence, and people didn’t understand why. One experiment, involving crickets, may have shed some light on the neurology behind that feeling.

Source: How Crickets Help Explain One of Schizophrenia’s Biggest Mysteries

It’s interesting how much detail the article goes into for the sake of explaining why we [generally] can’t tickle ourselves.  There’s an experiment that was demonstrated on QI about placing your hand next to a fake one, and someone else brushing the fake hand.  After a minute (or less for some), people reported feeling the brush strokes on the fake hand.

Canadian Athletes Who Battle Depression

Mental illness has become a trending topic. In the last decade, the self-inflicted deaths of many hockey players exposed the darker side of professional sport. Nevertheless, many Canadian athletes managed to win their battle against depression, even though it often involved having to quit their sport.

Source: Canadian athletes who battled depression

Clara Hughes is a seriously impressive athlete.  As the slide show demonstrates, depression can take it’s toll on anyone.

Do You Suffer From ‘Exploding Head Syndrome’? You’re Not Alone

Get your head out of the gutter.  Or was that premature? 😉

New findings indicate nearly one in five college-age students has been startled awake by an abrupt, loud noise that doesn’t actually exist. Known as “exploding head syndrome,” the psychological condition appears to be more common and disruptive than previously thought.

Source: Do You Suffer From ‘Exploding Head Syndrome’? You’re Not Alone.

I identify with the symptoms, but don’t fall in the demographic.  But that’s part of the research – better refinement and understanding.

It’s also a good moment to remind ourselves that hearing voices is not a sign of mental illness.  There are a wide range of experiences for people who hear voices, and that many of them don’t fit the typical definitions.  A large issue with this is stigma.  Our culture is quick to judge and subsequently dismiss/marginalize (if not ostracize) such people.