Make a Souffle Cheesecake with Just Three Ingredients

Her oven talks?!

Q: Isn’t this pretty much a pavlova, swapping the cream for cream cheese (and obviously not filling it)?

A cheesecake is nothing like a pavlova, at all. Cheesecakes are more or less dense and creamy textured, but a pavlova is crisp and hollow. I’ve never known a pavlova to have cream in the meringue portion. We must be talking about two different things.

But this isn’t really like a cheesecake either…

Use Chickpea Liquid as an Awesome Replacement for Eggs

Thanks to French chef Joël Roessel, I no longer need to pine hopelessly for the meringues of my youth, because I have chickpea brine.

Yes, the dregs you usually pour down the drain when you open a can of chickpeas are actually magical. When whipped, this substance takes on an uncannily egg-white-like texture. Coined aquafaba, or Latin-ish for bean liquid, by vegan baker Goose Wohlt, it’s attracted more than 11,000 members to the Facebook group “Vegan Meringue – Hits and Misses!” I’ve been hooked on this Facebook feed for the past two weeks, amazed by all the miraculous things other vegans have done with the chickpea-based foam, like bake beautiful cakes and create delicious-looking pasta.

Source: Stop Pouring Your Chickpea Liquid Down the Drain. It’s a Magical Ingredient.

I’ve covered garbanzo beans/chickpeas in the past, but I don’t have any information on the liquid.  And there are other egg substitutes/alternatives – what you use depends on what you’re trying to make.

Ever Cooked with Blood?

Back in 2008, renowned Danish chef René Redzepi and restaurateur Claus Meyer, now known to foodies as the masterminds behind the four-time world’s best restaurant Noma, opened a peculiar test kitchen in Copenhagen. The Nordic Food Lab, as they called it, was a space for chefs to experiment with the weird, new, and taboo in a way they never could in a working kitchen. Ever since, they’ve scored headlines with reports on cooking with fermented grasshoppers, pheasant essence, and even beaver anal glands. But perhaps no report they’ve issued has garnered as much attention and consternation as the one released this January by then-Food Lab intern Elisabeth Paul on how to substitute blood for eggs.

Source: Everything You Need to Know About Cooking with Blood

Very cool read.  I didn’t catch if they say whose specific blood they used/investigated – human, pig, etc.  But it makes sense that historically we’d have used blood if possible in hopes of nothing going to waste.  Blood donation is good for ~6 months as I understand – the article does talk about the difference between fresh and coagulated blood but not shelf life.