Kratom, the Herb of Last Resort for Recovering Addicts, Is in Legal Trouble

Three times a day, every day, for around a year, Tim Weaver would slide a tablespoon of kratom into his mouth. He’d let the bitter, grassy flavor of the powder seep into his tongue, gulp a glass of water to swallow it, then gulp more to wash the fine particles from between his teeth. Within an hour, the panicky feelings and achiness that accompanied Weaver’s opiate withdrawal would recede. “I was able live again and not just feel like I wanted to crumple up in a ball,” Weaver said. And as time went on, he relied less and less on the plant until he didn’t need to use kratom at all.

Source: Kratom, the Herb of Last Resort for Recovering Addicts, Is in Legal Trouble

According to an importer, climate and soil in the US are not ideal for cultivating mitragynine speciosa at scale.  But a greenhouse should work.

“I’ll never ask for another pain pill again”: ℞ database damage in Utah

For the most part, attorney Tyler Ayres practices criminal law in Draper, Utah. If you Google him, the first result reads “Utah DUI Attorney.” But recently, Ayres has grown into a de facto voice against the third-party doctrine and Utah’s drug database, a combination allowing authorities to access citizens’ prescription drug histories nearly carte blanche. Ayres has represented at least a dozen people with unforeseen issues because of this arrangement. The worse abuse he’s seen involves two of his clients: Candy Holmes and Russell Smithey.

Source: “I’ll never ask for another pain pill again”: ℞ database damage in Utah

The databases exist.  I don’t think any pharmacies exist these days without some form.  But the level of access in Utah is a bit tough to stomach.