How Much Flavor You Get from Ginger Depends on How You Cut It

There are the ingredients that wax and wane in the kitchen. The ingredients that somehow find themselves in every meal or are left to collect cobwebs in the corner of cabinets and grow soft in the back of the fridge. But not ginger — never ginger. This rhizome, often described as a root, is often used in my kitchen as a way to bring heat to a dish without reaching for a pepper — I just have to be sure to reach for the right one.

Source: Need to Kick Up Your Dish? Reach for (Mature) Ginger

Curious about how much vitamin K ginger has?  Know that you can use the peels to make tea

Freeze it. When you need it, grind it. The first thing you’ll notice is that the stringy part is no longer stringy and grinds right off. The second thing you’ll notice is that you’ll have fresh tasting ginger even when you keep it in the freezer for months. After more than half a year, there’s still no freezer burn or shriveled up ginger.

Different Mincing Methods Can Affect the Taste of Garlic

The fact that microplaned garlic is more pungent than minced isn’t particularly shocking in and of itself. We all know that garlic’s intensity in a dish isn’t just dependent on how much garlic there is, but also how it’s been prepared: a single whole clove will deliver less intensity than a crushed one, a crushed clove will be milder than a sliced clove, and a sliced one isn’t as pungent as a chopped or pureed one—the more cells we rupture when cutting garlic, the more potent it is.

Source: The Best Way to Mince Garlic

Which you want depends on your tastes, and the recipe in question.