Why You Crave Tomato Juice on an Airplane

Despite the fact that I never drink tomato juice on the ground, I’m once again craving the drink in mid air. In fact, on the very first flight I took as a kid – from Athens, Greece to Toronto back in 1991 – I distinctly remember ordering tomato juice. Now, why would a 10-year old kid crave tomato juice? And why am I now having the same craving?

Source: Why You Crave Tomato Juice on an Airplane

The comments echo my thoughts as well – who craves tomato juice, let alone when?  Now I crave a ginger ale…

Vegemite, Marmite: Do They Have Vitamin K?

This took a little digging, but in a 1 teaspoon (6 grams) serving there is either no vitamin K, or it is so small it does not warrant mention.  So you can eat a fair amount of it without concern, but I would still not recommend consuming an entire container to yourself in a single sitting unless you already do that regularly, and your INR has been relatively stable.

To those unaware, both vegemite and marmite are made with brewer’s yeast extract.  Vegemite is Australian/New Zealand, while marmite is British/UK.  Either is a spread you’d apply to toast. As I remember, either tastes like sadness but I digress…

Marmite/vegemite is an acquired taste for most, but it is incredibly healthy.  Very low in saturated fat, cholesterol and calories (9 calories per serving). And a good source of protein, iron and selenium, and a very good source of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, magnesium and potassium.  The warning about sodium is outdated – there’s no relationship between sodium and heart disease.

Vegemite/marmite is also vegetarian, and vegan.  However some of the key ingredients of vegemite/marmite are malt extract derived from barley and yeast extract, from yeast grown on barley and wheat.  Therefore either is not gluten free.

Vegemite/marmite contains MSG, which is not the health risk myth that still persists.  But if you have an allergy to yeast, or are prone to yeast infections (IE: thrush) – consuming vegemite/marmite is not a good idea.  Allergic reactions to baker’s yeast may include a congested/runny nose and inflammation/itching of the skin.

Umami: Cleverest Marketing Scheme?

What’s umami?

It’s a flavor variously described as savory and satisfying and rich. Foodies and scientists alike are calling it the “fifth taste,” an official category of flavor recognized by specialized taste receptors in the human mouth. (The other four are sweet, salty, bitter and sour.) Umami became a very trendy word and concept in the West a few years ago, spawning oodles of blog posts and entire websites based on it, not to mention restaurants named after it. Umami Burger has four locations in Los Angeles.

Source: Umami: The World’s Cleverest Marketing Scheme

Not the most coherent article I’ve read, it devolves into talking about MSG towards the end…

Is MSG Bad for Your Health?

A topic covered in a previous post.

“I see people all the time who are absolutely convinced that their allergic reactions are caused by MSG—it causes this, it causes that,” says allergist and immunologist Katharine Woessner of the Scripps Clinic Medical Group, who conducted a study on MSG’s effects. But, she says, “I think there’s a great misunderstanding.”
Indeed, most scientists today agree that the notion that MSG causes sickness in humans is unfounded.