Fueling and Training for Endurance Events

Knowing you’re able to ride as long as your route, riding mates or imagination requires is a very powerful feeling. Conversely, feeling dread about passing the one-hour, two-hour or three-hour point will limit your training and fitness gains, and ultimately your enjoyment.

Here’s how to break through these self-imposed endurance ceilings that are keeping you from making the most…

Source: How to increase cycling endurance

My favorite quote would be:

…consuming 15g honey or glucose taken every 10 miles during a 64km ride improves performance compared to water alone.

Imperial or metric? I can’t decide! 🙂

10 miles is 16 KM – they’re advocating every quarter of the distance.  What constitutes honey isn’t addressed in the article – honey is determined by having pollen in it, which can trigger allergic reactions for some and you’d have to investigate your store bought “honey” because they’re filtering a lot of pollen out these days.

I don’t think I could consume honey, which gets into the next point not raised by the article – try what they suggest but everyone is different so it’s up to you to figure out what actually works best.  But I do agree with the recommendation to have water with electrolytes in it – currently I’m using Nuun’s tabs, but have used a combination of Nuuns and Heed.

It was triathlon training that brought it to my attention that eating a good breakfast is a good idea, but requires you to eat early so you’re not bogged down, trying to swim/run/cycle/etc with all that in your tummy.  Lots I know get up around 3 or 4 in the morning on race day to eat, and then go back to bed for a couple of hours until the event.

It’s only the last three paragraphs that address endurance training.  It doesn’t come overnight, and it takes time.  I’ve yet to get into heart rate as a training tool – whatever minus your age is too generalized to be of value.  If your rate is high, but you can still talk?  Then you’re OK at that level.

Exercise Nutrition – Why Carbs?

A good sportive or gran fondo nutrition strategy can mean the difference between feeling strong and wanting to throw your road bike in a ditch. Just as getting in the base miles prepares you for the long ride ahead, the key to successful sportive nutrition begins well before your event.

Sports nutritionist Emma Barraclough knows the science and practice of getting your fuelling right inside out. Here she explains why carbs remain the primary source of fuel for high-performance endurance events and how to work out how much you’ll need.

Source: Cycling nutrition – why carbs?

I currently carb load with pizza.  The protein from meat and cheese isn’t ideal according to the article, but I eat early in hopes of getting around issues with protein and digestion.  And you can tweak that if you make your own, but it’s my cheat meal 😉