Make Tasty, Chewy Oat Bars in the Microwave

Q: If the British call these “flapjacks”, then what do they call flapjacks (aka pancakes)?

We don’t eat what you call pancakes.

What we call pancakes, you call crepes.

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What to Look for When Buying a Saucepan or Saucier

while a saucepan is standard in any kitchen, sauciers have mainly been the domain of restaurant chefs. We thought it was time this changed. We gathered eight models with capacities ranging from 3 to 3½ quarts—the most common large size—and compared them with our favorite 4-quart saucepan from All-Clad. Six of these pans were fully clad, meaning they were made of alternating layers of steel and aluminum, which takes advantage of the best qualities of each metal. We also tested a “disk bottom” model (only the base is fully clad, and the sides are a single layer of stainless steel) and a hefty model made of enameled cast iron. In them, we prepared risotto, gravy, and pastry cream, noting their cooking performance as well as how comfortable they were to maneuver. We also tested their reduction speed by boiling a measured amount of water in each model for 10 and 20 minutes and weighing the results. Finally, since their curvy sides are known for being easier to clean than the L-shaped sides of saucepans, we washed each model by hand.

Source: Why You Should Buy a Saucier

A saucier is hardly essential equipment for your kitchen, but if you make a lot of sauces, gravy, reductions, or just like to cook creamy dishes like risotto, you could learn a thing or two from how they’re designed. America’s Test Kitchen also put pans to the test, and looked at what makes a good one worth your money:

Use a Can of Evaporated Milk for the Creamiest Nacho Cheese Sauce Ever

If you’re a baking enthusiast, you’ve probably cracked a can or two of sweetened condensed milk in your time—it’s a key player in some of our favorite pies, cakes, and sticky-sweet sauces. But few people are as accustomed to cooking with its milder, milkier, unsweetened cousin: Evaporated milk—canned, shelf-stabilized, low-moisture cow’s milk—offers the same thick, rich texture of condensed milk without the added sugars, making it ideal for more savory preparations (and a handful of sweet ones to boot). Here’s a look at just how handy it can be.

Source: Everything You Can Do With a Can of Evaporated Milk

This is more accessible than the sodium citrate trick covered in the past. Know that evaporated milk is not condensed milk…

If I weigh 99 pounds and eat a pound Of Nachos, am I 1% Nacho?

20 Filling Foods That Help You Lose Weight

While you might find some of the research that follows surprising, there are no magic potions or super bars on this list. They’re all nutrient-rich whole foods, which a recent study revealed increase calorie burning by roughly 50% compared to processed foods, adds Sass. Eating less without feeling like you’re on a diet and burning more calories? We’ll take it.

Source: 20 Filling Foods That Help You Lose Weight

Of the list, the majority are accessible to those of us on warfarin/coumadin.  Apples, pears, lentils, and leeks are a concern but can be tolerated in small doses without a huge impact.  I don’t see anyone consuming lemons though…  Kimchi was a surprise.

Breastfeeding? 10 Superfoods for You and Yours

When you’re breastfeeding, time and convenience are huge. Who has time to whip up complete meals? Don’t stress! These nutritional powerhouses are quick and convenient.

Source: 10 Breastfeeding Superfoods

I have two caveats for the list:

  1. Spinach/Swiss chard/broccoli are high in vitamin K.  The article mentions these for calcium but sardines, tofu and sesame seeds are a better source.  Soy beans and lentils are a better source of iron too.
  2. Be aware of the arsenic concern associated with rice