Sandalwood Odor Could Be a Treatment for Leukemia

Olfactory receptors are not limited to your nose. You have them all over your body, including your blood. Now, synthetic sandalwood has been shown to promote cell death in cancer cells for patients with a certain kind of leukemia. This could open the door for a whole new kind of treatment.

Source: Sandalwood Odor Could Be a Treatment for Leukemia

It’s been known to cause cell death in my nose, too 😉

It’s extremely specific to that one type of cancer, which is understandable – cancer really is just a catch-all for unregulated cell growth.  Different locations have different responses to therapy.

Get Ripped, Not Rude: Ten Rules for Proper Gym Etiquette

Jerks are everywhere, but people being jerks in the gym can be especially grating. All you want to do is lift heavy stuff in peace, but there they are, with their sweaty butt imprints on a bench, loud conversations on the phone, and equipment strewn all over the floor. Oops—does that sound like you? Here’s how to make the gym a better place for all.

Source: Get Ripped, Not Rude: Ten Rules for Proper Gym Etiquette

One rule the article missed: Most women do not go to the gym seeking a hot date.

Remove Odors from Your Entire Home by Simmering Vinegar

Some of our favorite tips in the kitchen are for getting it sparkling clean; these are their stories.

Source: 7 Kitchen Cleaning Tricks That Really Work

The fruit fly one is interesting.  …Not that I have a need for it… 😉

How/why does this work? What does the vinegar do?

Vinegar is about 90% water, and about 5-10% acetic acid.  Most scented molecules contain a functional group like an amine (putrescine, for example, one of the rotting smells), a thiol (ethanethiol, i.e. skunk smell), or other non-carbon molecules. Acetic acid can bind these to form molecules that your nose can not detect, thus eliminating the odor. Even if it’s not forming an actual chemical bond, it can still coordinate (i.e. form hydrogen bonds, which are pretty strong themselves. It’s analogous to dissolving.) thus removing the scented molecules from the air, woodwork, carpet, etc.

Why Do Other People’s Farts Smell Worse?

In 2005, two researchers published a series of articles investigating the subject of other people’s smelliness. They examined how much disgust people would feel and show after smelling a variety of odors, including armpits, garbage and farts. Among the stinks examined, farts elicited the strongest negative response, and across all body odors, people consistently rated odors of other people worse than their own (with one notable exception in that the armpit sweat of one’s partner was generally rated as less offensive than a person’s own…)

Source: Why Do Other People’s Farts Smell Worse?

Bonus Facts:

  • If you eat red cabbage (especially uncooked, as in coleslaw) your poo turns a lovely shade of blue.
  • Too much grape cool-aid or grape juice turns poo bright green.

What Gives a Decaying Body Its Distinctive Odor?

Dead bodies give off a distinctive, sickly-sweet odour that’s immediately recognisable and hard to forget. The smell of death can consist of more than 400 volatile organic compounds in a complex mixture. These compounds are produced by the actions of bacteria, which break down the tissues in the body into gases and salts.

Source: What Gives a Decaying Body Its Distinctive Odor?

Cadaverine – how creative.

De-Stink Your Shoes with a Homemade UV Light Sanitizing Box

Someone posted a five step Instructables project to use germicidal UV lamps to remove odor from your shoes.  You mount the lamps on something to support them, then stick the lamps in your shoes and crank up the heat. The foil around the box will retain the heat and take care of most of the little nasties crawling around in your shoes.

If the women don’t find you handsome, at least they’ll find you handy… 😉

My cycling shoes have a bigger issue being wet than my running shoes, but that’s because I generally spend more time in the rain while cycling than running.  A trick I learnt was to have newspaper onhand for days like that.  Newspaper, not the glossy stuff like you get on some flyers.  Remove the insole if you can, and stuff the shoe with newspaper.  Check on the shoes every 3-4 hours, applying new/dry newspaper if necessary.  The cost to effectiveness ratio is staggering.  Newspaper is incredibly absorbent, and recyclable.  The local free paper is suddenly being delivered to me, but prior to that I’d grab a stack of free newspaper at the local grocery store on my way out.

Stainless Steel: Erases Aroma of Garlic, Onion

If you love cooking with garlic, you know it does a lot of good in recipes by helping build flavor — but its strong odor can linger for hours, especially on our hands. We’ve all been in the situation where after preparing a wonderful meal, we’re left with the stench of garlic on our fingers — yuck! There are a few tricks people often recommend to eliminate the smell: lemon juice or vinegar, rubbing your hands with salt, or even using toothpaste! But those don’t work — all they do is mask the garlic smell. So what does really work? Stainless steel.

Stainless steel, of all things, has been shown to remove the odor of garlic. Kitchen gadget companies have even created stainless steel bars shaped like soap for removing kitchen smells from your hands. But using any stainless steel surface works, too. Try your stainless steel kitchen sink or faucet — just hold your hands under cold running water while rubbing the stainless steel for 10 seconds. Voila, the smell will be gone.

Let’s explain why stainless steel works.

Source: Why Stainless Steel Erases Garlic’s Aroma

It works, but not for the reason the article supplies.  Sulfur does not react with water, even at elevated temperatures.  And sulfuric acid is odorless (provided you don’t consider the burning an odor), and sulfur is also inert with regards to steel. Whoever wrote that doesn’t science very well.

Tips:

  • If you have a stainless steel sink, just rub your hands on that.
  • For fish, wash your hands with spearmint tooth paste.