What Your Online Comments Say About You

When we comment on news stories, most of us hope to say something about the topic at hand — even (or maybe especially) if it’s that the author got it all wrong. But what do the comments we leave say about us — about our beliefs, our biases and how we act when the ordinary rules don’t apply? And how do our comments affect the beliefs of others?

Source: What Your Online Comments Say About You

The following was posited years ago:

Normal Person + Anonymity + Audience = Total Fuckwad

John Gabriel’s Greater Internet Fuckwad Theory

It happens in the real world. It has always happened… Why would it surprise anybody that it happens on the Internet?

Man, I just wanted to know how babby is formed

Someone is wrong on the Internet…

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Don’t Read the Comments—They Can Make You Mistrust Real Experts

A recent paper in the Journal of Advertising suggests that online commenting may sway people as much as public service announcements (PSAs) from health authorities. Depending on who’s doing the commenting, comments may sometimes be even more influential than PSAs.

While it may seem ludicrous that people could trust online comments as much as PSAs, it’s important to remember that online comments have an important advantage: they’re seen as coming from an unbiased source. This is why product reviews by consumers online and other “electronic word-of-mouth” communications are often seen as a trusted resource.

Source: Don’t read the comments—they can make you mistrust real experts

I would never lie to you.  Sincerely, Dr. Whiskers

Just because I have it, doesn't mean it's true

From the CollegeHumour “If Google was a Guy…” series

What the article doesn’t mention is if there’s any relation to confirmation bias

On the internet, nobody knows you're a dog

Woof! I mean…