Standing Desks Are No Replacement For a Workout

Planting your behind in a seat for hours at a time has been squarely linked to an increase in health problems, from shorter lifespans to a slew of diseases, including cancer. Concerned office workers have leapt to standing desks as healthier alternatives. But prolonged sitting may be getting a bum rap, a new study suggests.

Source: Standing desks are no replacement for a workout

The moral of the story is still this: go out and get some exercise.

No gym membership needed. Go out and run. Or walk at first if you can’t run. Or try cycling. Or try rowing. Or swimming. Can’t swim? Even better- you’ll go on a great journey just learning how to swim crawl correctly.

What – winters are bad where you live? Cross country skiing.   Endurance exercise has the power to change your life.

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If Genetic Screening Helps Those at Risk, Why Not Screen Everyone?

Trish is just one of about 1,500 patients at risk of hereditary cancer that are seen each year in Ireland. Most of these cases are related to breast cancer, says Prof. Andrew Green, director of Ireland’s National Centre for Medical Genetics. “The way people are identified is either because they themselves have had cancer at a young age or they have relatives at young age with breast or ovarian cancer.”

Source: If genetic screening helps those at risk, why not screen everyone?

Ginger: How Much Vitamin K?

Not to be confused with redheads… 😉

I remember ginger as something I was told to avoid while on blood thinners.  But research consistently says consuming ginger is not a concern while on warfarin/coumadin.  There’s 0.1 mcg of vitamin K in 100 grams/3.5 ounces of raw ginger – there’s so little, it’s basically non-existent.  I love ginger, as an ingredient in a recipe or various forms of candy: covered in sugar, or chocolate…

There’s numerous health benefits, to the point that hospitals stock ginger ale for sore throats and to soothe stomach aches.  I’d never heard of ginger being used for motion and sea sickness, but apparently ginger is good for reducing dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and cold sweating.  Here’s some other things ginger is known for:

  • anti-inflammatory
  • protection against colorectal cancer
  • Ovarian cancer cell death
  • boosting the immune system

Tips for ginger:

  • Freeze it to make it last longer, and easier to peel or grate.  But hard to cut…
  • Putting powdered ginger into a recipe that calls for fresh ginger is not recommended and vice versa.
  • A nugget of ginger can be used for flavouring (IE: in a soup), but removed before serving
  • You could peel & grate the ginger before freezing, but this bypasses two major benefits:
    1. Ginger grates really easily and finely when frozen, and even obviates the need to peel
    2. You don’t create a lot of surface area for oxidization when you do it this way, which means it actually tastes fresh

Dogs Can Sniff Out Thyroid Cancer in Your Urine

Now we know why they smell our crotch!

Researchers from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) presented findings at the Endocrine Society’s ENDO 2015 conference March 6 in San Diego showing nearly 90 percent accuracy using scent-trained dogs to detect thyroid cancer.

“Detecting and diagnosing thyroid cancer can be difficult, because it’s often looking for a very small number of occurrences in a very large background of benign nodules. It is also difficult to say with certainty that a patient is cancer-free after surgery,” said Donald Bodenner, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of geriatrics at UAMS and director of the Thyroid Center and chief of endocrine oncology.

“Having a technique with which to do these things with a higher degree of certainty would be a tremendous advance in thyroid cancer,” he said.

the researchers believe the training could potentially be used in diagnosis of other cancers such as ovarian, breast, kidney, bladder and prostate.

Source: UAMS Researchers Use Scent-Trained Dogs to Detect Thyroid Cancer

Non-invasive, just shy of 90% accuracy… But I have to wonder about costs to train, house, and exercise the dogs for their life (10 years on average).  Still, it’d be one of the more fun lab jobs I can think of.