Why You Shouldn’t Grind Up Nuts Fresh From the Oven

Obviously you know not to toss a food processor blade into a sinkful of soapy water (uhh, you do know that right?), but there are a few less-obvious ways you may be screwing up your food processor game. Make sure you’re not committing these crimes, and you’ll be chopping, dicing, and pesto-ing to your heart’s content in no time.

Source: It Is Very Possible You Are Making These 6 Food Processor Common Mistakes

When I need to grind/chop up nuts, fruits or anything else, I will stick them in the freezer for a little bit. It seems to help eliminate the creation of a that pasty/butter like stuff which makes it easier to clean the food processor.

This goes for blenders as well, but for most things.. add liquids to the bowl first.

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The Right Way to Put Out a Kitchen Fire

Your kitchen is a dangerous place, just waiting to combust into flames at any moment. That was our Stern Bolding—did it work? Are you reading this while two slices of leftover pizza are starting to singe in the oven? Stay alert! Here’s how to deal with a kitchen fire, according to Lt. Mancuso.

Source: How to Put Out a Kitchen Fire Because OMG FLAMES

Don’t keep your fire extinguisher in the kitchen. Keep it just outside the kitchen, so a kitchen fire can’t block access to it. If you put it inside a cabinet or something, make sure everyone who does any cooking in your kitchen knows where it is.

Turn Overcooked Rice Into Tasty, Crispy Crackers

To me, “overcooked” usually means singed to a black, unrecognizable putrescence.  Followed by desperate soaking of the pot, before working with the roughest scrub bud I can find.  Rinse, repeat… 😉

But I admit – that does look really easy to do.  Add a dash of your favourite seasoning…  You can also make fish cakes out of the leftover rice, or make this simple soup.  Quickly rinse rice with a French Press (AKA Bodum) if you need to.  But be aware that there is arsenic in rice.

Want to Toast Nuts? Use the Microwave

The oven takes a long time to preheat—even in the toaster oven getting your nuts from the pantry to perfectly roasted can take 15 minutes or more. In a real oven, that time jumps up even higher. A skillet is faster, but it also requires much more attention, with near-constant stirring and tossing if you want to avoid having nuts that look like the ones above: raw in spots and almost black in others.

The microwave, on the other hand, heats quickly, efficiently, and evenly from all directions, and with small items like nuts, can actually cook them from the outside and the inside at basically the same rate.

Source: Toasting Nuts? The Microwave is Your Best Friend

The articles goes on to mention that the flavour isn’t quite as desired, but adding a half teaspoon of neutral oil (vegetable, canola) can help.  But if your recipe calls for cooking food along with the nuts in a skillet – follow the recipe.

Related reading:

Steak: 10 Rubs and Marinades

Youtube, 6:07 minutes.  The video is pretty, but doesn’t give portioning or summarize – details are on the web page.

Once again, we’ve asked our friend Chef Frank Deloach to help us think of 10 exceptional ways to season steak to add flavor without adding fat. Directions? Combine ingredients, rub all over your gorgeously marbled beef slabs (think Ribeye, Strip and Sirloin) and pop it in the fridge (two hours max) to soak up all those beautiful flavors. Cook in cast-iron skillet to desired doneness. Easy peasy. Tip: For the juiciest steak possible, salt your beef after you’ve cooked it.

Source: 10 Fancy Steak Rubs and Marinades That Go Beyond Salt and Pepper

  • Tex Mex
  • Kalbi
  • Spanish
  • Kung Pao
  • Brazil
  • Montreal
  • North Africa
  • English Pub
  • Carne Asada
  • Malaysian

Cast iron and an oven to finish is the goal.  Most real chefs use a salamander, but will use a skillet/oven combo if they don’t have that particular piece of equipment.  There’s nothing inherently wrong with a grill.