Freeze Cranberry Sauce and Gravy for The Best Thanksgiving Croissants Possible

Making Thanksgiving croissants is a three-day process. I started making the compound butter two days ago. I paddled together butter and Thanksgiving spices: dried sage, dried thyme, granulated onion, onion powder, salt, sugar, pepper, and a little turmeric for color. We developed the recipe from looking at the ingredient list for Stovetop stuffing.

Source: How to Make Thanksgiving Croissants

Lots assume that there will be a lot of leftover gravy. In my experience, gravy always runs out long before the turkey does, and I often have to cobble together substitutes for that first yummy batch with the meat dripping and carving juices.  So if you run out:

Roast and then simmer the giblets with veggies to get some flavorful broth to add to the pan drippings. Start with a (I know, it’s horrible) store-bought stock, dissolve flour or cornstarch in water, add it to the boiling stock, then add the giblet stock and pan drippings. If you use decent quality store stock, you won’t notice the difference and you can make half a gallon of gravy.  Or buy a couple of turkey thighs or legs and roast them a few days ahead and store the deglazed pan drippings in the freezer until the big day.

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Brighten Up Any Dish by Adding a Little Acidity

There are times when seasoning more with more salt, pepper and herbs just isn’t the answer. For those times, a dash of acid usually rounds things out perfectly. Adding an acid (like lemon juice, vinegar or tomatoes) punches up a dish, often completely changing or rounding out the flavors and creating more balance. I cook a lot with grains at home, and if I throw together a ho-hum grain bowl or pasta dish, it’s often a little lemon zest and juice that wakes things up and makes it truly tasty. Citrus also cuts through fat nicely, making heavy bland sauces more delicious.

Source: Quick Fix to a Bland Meal? Add Some Acid!

Squeeze some fresh lemon juice over fresh steamed broccoli for an amazing experience.  Way better than melted butter!

Make Any Tapenade With This Simple Formula

Enter tapenade. If you’re familiar only with the kind that comes in the small jar from the supermarket, you’re missing out. The time saved may seem to compensate for the less-than-ideal flavor, but you can make make a much better version at home in under 30 minutes. Here’s how:

Source: How to Make Tapenade Without a Recipe

There’s 1.4 mcg of vitamin K in 100 grams of olives, and the recipe calls for 2 cups (~360 grams).  That’s ~5 mcg of vitamin K…  Capers on the other hand contain 24.6 mcg of vitamin k per 100 grams.

Keeping in mind that the vitamin K dose is quoted on consuming all of the tapenade.  I’m not judging… 😉

On a more serious note, I would not recommend eating tapenade before an INR test.  If there’s a long enough interval between tests (1 month), then I’d suggest tapenade soon after getting tested so you have time for your INR level to recover in an effort to not have to adjust your medication dose.

Give Your Leftover Potato Salad New Life By Roasting It

It was a pretty simple potato salad: large cubes of potatoes, skin on, tossed with mayonnaise, mustard, salt, pepper, red wine vinegar, and the last of the season’s chopped ramps. Mayonnaise is mostly oil, and the rest of it amounts to seasoning, so we figured toss it in the oven and see what happens.

Source: Turn Leftover Potato Salad Into Crispy Roasted Potatoes

…you could make potato salad out of it again, after roasting!

LA Times Does Series on Exploitation of Mexican Farmworkers

It’s a four part series –

The tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers arrive year-round by the ton, with peel-off stickers proclaiming “Product of Mexico.”

Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers. American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.

These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.

Source:

Salt Isn’t Always the Enemy: 5 Cool Tricks

…though salt excels at bringing out the flavor in other ingredients (and even increases your perception of their aroma before you take a bite), it’s also delicious all on its own. Just make sure you have the right NaCl on hand: Maldon, kosher, or Celtic varieties have the large-size crystals and briny taste that make them especially good when you want to shine a spotlight on this tasty mineral.

Source: Salt Isn’t Always the Enemy: 5 Cool Tricks

Some are reading thinking “salt is just NaCl…”, how can there be different types?  Table salt has had iodine added to it for almost 100 years now to prevent gout – it was originally developed by the Swiss.  While it’s all sodium chloride, there’s additional elements in the compound to give distinct characteristics (a la sea salt).