This Calculator Estimates How Much Slower You’ll Run With Age

Your mileage may vary 😉

Try as we might to fight or deny it, old age will impact our running and athletic ability. By age 35, the rates of decline are so predictably linear that this calculator by a Yale economics professor maps out just how slowly you can expect to run the same distance as the years run by.

Source: This Calculator Estimates How Much Slower You’ll Run With Age

Does this mean I’ll go negative?

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Stuffy Offices Can Halve Cognitive Scores

The best way to tackle a tough task at work may be to crack a window and breathe deep.

Compared with inhaling fresh air, gulping down the stale air found in conventional office buildings can stifle cognitive function by half, researchers report in Environmental Health Perspectives. The finding suggests that improving the performance, productivity, and health of many office workers could be done with just a fresh breeze.

Source: Stuffy offices can halve cognitive scores

Ugh, those dry erase markers need to die.  And cube farms are nothing less than soul-sucking vortexes of seething hatred and broken dreams, sprinkled with shattered aspirations and tears of lament.   Cue up Office Space

Hospitals That Track Their Performance Don’t Improve Healthcare

In recent years, perhaps in response to an uptick in inquiries about hospital performance and its effect on patient outcomes, a number of programs have been developed to help hospitals track how the patients they care for do. The most prominent of these is the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP). This system allows hospitals to compare their performance relative to that of other participating hospitals and provides them with detailed descriptions of patient outcomes as adjusted for the patients’ risks.

Since 1994, the ACS NSQIP has been tracking data on 135 patient-related variables. As its name implies (Quality Improvement Program), the hope is that this will lead to improvements for patient care—having this information will hopefully motivate hospitals to improve their outcomes and reduce the payments charged to Medicare. However, there has not been a study examining whether this expectation has been met until now. The new study published in JAMA seems to indicate that a hospital’s participation in this outcomes/costs-tracking program does not directly lead to improved patient care or reduced Medicare costs.

Source: Hospitals that track their performance don’t improve healthcare

Beating will continue until morale improves.