There’s Nothing Special About Alkaline Water

From juice detoxes to SoulCycle, there’s always some transformative cure-all making the rounds. Recently, the benefits of alkaline water and a veggie-rich alkaline diet have been in the news, finding support from the notably not-so-scientific likes of Dr. Oz. Proponents of alkaline water — that is, water that possesses a higher, less-acidic pH thanks to having fewer hydrogen ions — claim the stuff can do anything from preventing cancer and fighting off illness to simply increasing energy, all by altering the pH of the drinker’s body. But the scientific community is fighting back by insisting that, like most cure-alls, alkaline water actually cures nothing.

Source: The Truth About Alkaline Water

Out of curiosity I bought two different brands of water claiming to be “alkaline” from Whole Foods. I tested both with a pH meter (at about 22 degrees C) and they measured 6.9 and 7.0. So, pretty neutral and not alkaline at all. I wrote one of the companies and never heard back.

Not only is the alkaline water not doing anything for you, but it might not even be alkaline to begin with.

Does a Diet of Chestnuts Really Flavor the Meat of a Pig?

Those of us watching Hannibal know that when Hannibal feeds someone chestnuts, it’s a warning sign. Supposedly a diet of chestnuts flavors meat. Let’s look at several studies on the subject (done with pigs, not humans) and try to determine if that’s true.

Source: Does a Diet of Chestnuts Really Flavor the Meat of a Pig?

What’s interesting is that some will warn about this for those with nut allergies.  I don’t know if it is actually a risk, but who wants to find out?

The Scientific Formula for Perfect Eggnog

Have you ever felt like making boozy eggnog is a total crapshoot? Half the time you get a smooth and delicious cocktail, and half the time it’s a lumpy, curdled mess. What gives?

Turns out there’s a formula you ought to be following. Here’s the scientific secret that will get you a silky nog every time.

Source: The Scientific Formula for Perfect Eggnog

Why Honey Doesn’t Spoil

Honey is magic. Besides its delicious taste, it’s pretty much the only food that does not spoil while in an edible state. But why, exactly, doesn’t honey go bad?

Honey has a lot of pretty incredible properties. It’s been used and investigated for medicinal properties for a long time, especially as a treatment for open wounds. Herodotus reported that the Babylonians buried their dead in honey, and Alexander the Great may have been embalmed in a coffin full of honey.

The oldest honey ever found was unearthed in Georgia, and dates back over 5,000 years. So, if you found yourself in possession of some 5,000 year-old honey, could you eat it? Well. . .

Source: Why honey is the only food that doesn’t go bad

Chinese honey is perfectly fine. It’s embargoed because the American government concluded that China is artificially lowering the price of its honey – not for health reasons.  However, what is “honey” is largely determined by pollen count.  By that standard, what you see on the shelves labeled as “honey” isn’t necessarily honey.  Yes, pollen that some are allergic to…  Real honey is cloudy, not clear.

Did you know there are other things that will almost never spoil?  Vinegar (especially the extremely distilled kind, like white vinegar) can last a long time. But it can lose its flavor over time. Similarly for vodka. Anything with a high alcohol content takes forever to go bad.