There’s No Such Thing as “Enough” Exercise for Heart Health

If you’re among of the millions of Americans who dutifully carve out 30 minutes a day for the moderate-intensity exercise recommended by experts based on the idea that you’re doing all you can for your heart, you’re in for some disappointing news.

A new analysis published Monday in the journal Circulation finds that that amount of activity may not be good enough.

Source: New study says 30 minutes of exercise a day is not enough. You should double or quadruple that.

Let the guilt trip begin! 🙂

With family, work and such – it’s really hard to get much exercise in.  But it’s worth it.

Look Forward to Workouts by Knowing How Awesome You’ll Feel Afterward

I was going to skip my daily swim the other morning. I had already walked three miles with a friend and taken my dog to the park for his exercise. I was really tired, my back was sore, I had a column to write and lots to do around the house.

But I knew from past experience that I would feel much better after 40 minutes of swimming laps. So in I went. And, yes, I did feel better — not just refreshed, but more energetic, clearheaded and better prepared than I would have been otherwise to tackle the day’s essentials.

Source: Rethinking Exercise as a Source of Immediate Rewards

The article makes recommendations similar to what a study recently suggested about what to do for long term weight loss.

I’m often reminding myself that I (almost) never regret a workout, but I often regret skipping one.  Like a friend of mine, I like starting my day by cycling.  It throws off my routine and day in general; the cycling wakes me up.  And if it’s not one activity, there’s another – sometimes I change things up to go for a run instead, or swim if possible.  Doing the three disciplines of triathlon doesn’t mean I (or anyone else) has to race – it’s just cross training until you put on the swim cap and line up for the start 😉

6 Healthy Ways to Get More Protein

The required daily amount of protein varies by age, gender, and level of physical activity. In general, adult women who fit in at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise (such as jogging or biking) five times weekly should consume 5 to 5.5 ounces of protein per day. Women who work out more should increase their protein intake accordingly. Each of the following options offers a meatless alternative for one ounce of protein.

Source: 6 Healthy Ways to Get More Protein

If you’re interested in protein consumption information, this article is a good read.

Almonds can be costly; sunflower seeds are marginally cheaper.  The primary ingredient of hummus is chickpeas/garbanzo beans (how much vitamin k?)…  Don’t get me wrong – I like hummus.  Hummus, like avocado, is very nutritious but high in calories.  Peanut butter isn’t an option if you’re allergic, but no mention about other nut butters

A High-Protein Diet May Help Lower Blood Pressure

A new study has found that eating high-levels of certain proteins found in meat and plant-based foods can lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness leading to better heart health. According to researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA), eating foods rich in amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, could be good for your heart.

Source: Load Up! A High-Protein Diet May Help Lower Blood Pressure

The nice part is the next paragraph details that protein can be sourced from various places, not just meat.  There’s a very good reason to not source protein from red meat: Study: Large Red Meat Consumption Triggers Immune Response, Leading to Cancer.  Also, a good article on the 1 lb to 1 gram of protein myth with relation to exercise.

This is What Happens When You Stop Exercising

Ever wonder what would happen if you stopped working out? A new study on identical twins published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise explores exactly that, and the results are dramatic.

Source: This is What Happens When You Stop Exercising

The sample size is small, but then how many identical twins can you get to do this?

Related reading:

How to Make Yourself Poop

How to be #1 in the #2 business:

On a perfect race morning, you’d wake up, have breakfast, and use the bathroom—at least once, maybe twice—and then head to your starting corral feeling great, not worrying whether you’ll have to stop along the way for an emergency Number 2.

But sometimes, your routine fails you. Maybe you’re traveling and in a different time zone, maybe your diet’s been a little off, or maybe you’ve just got a nervous stomach. But some mornings, you just can’t go, no matter how much you know it’s essential for a good run.

So what do you do now? We looked at the latest research, and talked with Felice Schnoll-Sussman, MD, a gastroenterologist at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University and a New York City marathon finisher, to find out. Here’s what science says about how to get yourself to go.

Source: How to Make Yourself Poop

Most think it’s the caffeine in coffee, but decaf works just the same.  No one wants to be immortalized like this guy, but it can be the defining moment to see how much you really want the result you trained for.  I already do some of what the article suggests – get up earlier, moving through the house as I get breakfast.  It depends, but often can feel like delayed reaction between when I got out of bed.

Teehee… backfire.