Thankfully, Doctors Are Making a Catheter That Hurts Less

If you’ve ever had a urinary catheter, you’ll know they’re unpleasant. If you haven’t, imagine someone threading a tube up through your urethra into your bladder and … yes, yes they hurt. Mercifully, scientists are working out how to make the process less painful. Here’s how.

Source: Thankfully, Doctors Are Making a Catheter That Hurts Less

Surely, someone is taking the piss?

We Used to Recycle Drugs From Patients’ Urine

When penicillin was first used medically, in 1940, it was a time of austerity. While Alexander Fleming first discovered penicillin in 1928, his world-changing observations had garnered hardly any notice, and it wasn’t until 1938 that another team of researchers finally began to isolate and test the active chemical ingredients in the world’s first antibiotic. By that time, World War II was raging, and medical manufacturing capacity that could be devoted to experimental treatments was in short supply.

Producing usable penicillin from Penicillium notatum mold was no easy feat, says PBS: “In spite of efforts to increase the yield from the mold cultures, it took 2,000 liters of mold culture fluid to obtain enough pure penicillin to treat a single case of sepsis in a person.”

Pencilin production couldn’t happen nearly fast enough to match rising demand. To make up the shortfall, writes Rebecca Kreston for her Body Horrors blog at Discover Magazine, researchers came up with a novel way to get the penicillin they needed: extracting and isolating it from patients’ urine.

Source: We Used to Recycle Drugs From Patients’ Urine

40 – 99 % of the penicillin antibiotic is excreted in urine in its fully functional form about 4 hours after administration thanks to our kidneys!   But doesn’t that mean that the dose was too high?
…But even today, some portion of the active ingredient from many drugs passes through our bodies unchanged. Instead of isolating and recycling them, though, we send them down the toilet and out into the world.
That part is why I sourced the Smithsonian article rather than the Discover one.  While our ability to synthesize antibiotics has greatly improved, the impact to our water supply is rather scary.

Why You Definitely Shouldn’t Drink Your Own Pee

During his 127-hour ordeal under that boulder, backpacker Aaron Ralston resorted to consuming his own urine in order to stay alive before eventually hacking off his own forearm and escaping. This was an extreme survival case, and pretty much the only time you should even consider drinking from your own spigot. Here’s why.

Source: Why You Definitely Shouldn’t Drink Your Own Pee

It doesn’t make sense that ingesting waste water would be a good idea.