Turn Vegetable Peels Into a Crunchy Snack Instead of Trashing Them

Warning: You may wish you had a time machine after reading this post. Because what you’ll discover is that, for years, you’ve been missing out on a ridiculously tasty treat — baked vegetable peels.

When prepping potatoes, carrots, parsnips, and other root vegetables, it’s common practice to first wash and then remove the outer layer of skin. But the next time you ready these ingredients for a recipe, throw out old habits instead of the scraps. And then set those peels aside to bake into a crunchy, chip-like snack to enjoy between meals or while making the meal.

Source: Why You’ll Never Again Throw Away Vegetable Peels

This doesn’t work for me – I don’t peel vegetables.  I just wash, prepare/cook, and consume.  There’s nutritional value in the outer skin of vegetables, and it’s more effort to peel (besides mess)…

How to Avoid the Dreaded “Carb Coma”

Carb-heavy meals are notorious for making you hungry and cranky later in the day, not to mention gaining weight. But if you really want to eat your pasta and potatoes, you can make the meal easier for your body to deal with by adding other food to it. Pancakes and bacon are a better bet than pancakes alone.

Source: How to Avoid the Dreaded “Carb Coma”

Related read: If I Eat Steak then Pineapple – Which is Digested First?

Use an Apple Slicer to Cut Potatoes Even Faster

We may or may not need to be bringing in a boatload of mashed potatoes to the Preschool Thanksgiving Pitch In tomorrow morning… so tonight meant peeling and chopping up lots and lots and lots of taters…

So what did Puddie do?

Source: Cutting Up Potatoes~ Super Fast

I wouldn’t recommend you go out and buy an apple slicer for this purpose alone, but if you already own one, we’ve got to admit: it’s pretty handy.   Apples, potatoes, onions, pears, and I think once on a big mozzarella ball.

I personally don’t peel potatoes.  There’s nutritional value in the skin, and I often mash it anyway to the point I can’t tell.  But it’s really important to wash the potato before preparation if you are keeping the skin.  They’ve been exposed to various chemicals and such en route to the grocery store, and while sitting on display.

Sour Cream, Crema, Crème Fraîche: What’s the Difference?

The headline makes me think of Seinfeld: “What’s the…”  But I digress…

Sour cream, crema, and crème fraîche: these three dairy products are often used to add a cool lusciousness and body to foods like potatoes, salads, and nachos. But while all three products are made the same way—by adding friendly bacteria to heavy cream—they’re all technically different ingredients.

Source: Sour Cream, Crema, Crème Fraîche: What’s the Difference?

While we’re here, might as well address vitamin K content…

Sour cream contains:

  • 1.8 mcg of vitamin K per 100 grams – that’s 2% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • 4.1 mcg of vitamin K per 1 cup/240 grams – 5%

I couldn’t even find information on crema – every search engine thinks I misspelt “cream”.  Sigh…

Crème Fraîche, according to sources, has 0 mcg of vitamin K.

If you consume in consistent quantity and frequency, you’re fine because your blood thinner medication dose already has it taken into account.  But depending on the amount you consume and timing just before an INR test, there’s a chance you could have a conversation with your doctor about changing your dose and testing again in the near future.

Avoid these Gluten-Free Baking Mistakes!

Ourman has also been hard at work in our test kitchen, creating entirely gluten-free, BA-approved desserts. After tasting them all (they’re delicious), we spoke with Ourman about how to give up rye, barley, and wheat without sacrificing flavor, texture, or enjoyment: What are the most common gluten-free mistakes? Here’s how to totally screw up gluten-free cooking—or not.

Source: Avoid these Gluten-Free Baking Mistakes!

The last two are lifestyle/health related, not baking per se.