Make Your Dips, Dressings, and Drinks a Little More Probiotic with Kefir

Tangy kefir is like a pourable, drinkable version of yogurt. It’s praised for containing good-for-you probiotics that aid in healthy digestion. While kefir makes for a delicious beverage all on its own, there are a lot of other smart ways you can put this fermented drink to work in the kitchen.

This fermented dairy drink is similar to yogurt and buttermilk, and makes an ideal stand-in for both. You can pick up a bottle of kefir in the dairy aisle at the grocery store, or you can skip the lines and make your own at home.

Source: 5 Smart Ways You Could Be Using Kefir in Your Cooking

It can be used in pretty much any recipe that calls for un-fermented dairy. Use it in place of buttermilk, spoon for spoon, in savory dressings and dips, or as a tart milk substitute in smoothies, lassis, or even frozen yogurt. (Wanna get next level? Make your own!)

That said, I can’t find any substantial nutritional data on kefir.  One source claims it has vitamin K, yet [the similar] yogurt has very little vitamin K.  I advise caution and frequent testing if kefir is not already part of your consistent diet.

How to Figure Out If Your Supplements Are Safe

Supplements aren’t regulated like drugs. Their makers don’t have to prove that they’re safe or effective. Let’s talk about some of the pitfalls of using supplements, and how you can improve your chances of getting a pill that does what it’s supposed to.

Source: How to Figure Out If Your Supplements Are Safe

I recently witness a cashier at the local supermarket question a guy in his 20s about buying garlic supplements.  An actual garlic bulb costs less than a dollar – the supplement container was probably $5+, and it’s highly questionable that the supplement contained anything of value.  Seriously…

Raw Milk’s “Health Benefits” Are Mostly Imaginary

Maybe you like the taste of raw milk. (That’s more likely because it’s grass-fed than because it’s raw, but okay.) But if you’re chasing after health benefits in raw milk, think again.

Source: Raw Milk’s “Health Benefits” Are Mostly Imaginary

There’s a reason we pasteurize milk…  When I was a kid, we had goats for a while.  Going to goats milk was easy, but it took a while when transitioning back to [cow, pasteurized] milk.  I remember the flavour being a little bitter.

Make Dairy-Free Yogurt with Coconut Milk

After trying a pot of super creamy, slightly tangy coconut yogurt from the supermarket, I started to wonder how it was made — and if I could make it myself. A bit of research and experimentation later, I discovered it’s not hard at all! As soon as you’ve gathered a few supplies, you’ll be well on your way to making (and falling in love with) this delicious dairy-free yogurt.

Source: How to Make Dairy-Free Coconut Yogurt

FYI: Even reduced-fat coconut milk contains about 10 grams of saturated fat per 100 grams, compared to about 2.3 grams per 100 ml in reduced-fat cow’s milk.  But if you can’t have dairy…