Fitness Isn’t Just for the Wealthy: How to Stay Healthy on a Budget

Personal trainers, fresh vegetables, and gym memberships all cost money. Not everyone can afford such luxuries. It’s one reason why being poor is too expensive—a crappy diet and sedentary lifestyle costs more down the line. Don’t worry: While fitness comes at a price, it’s not one you have to pay out of your wallet.

Source: Fitness Isn’t Just for the Wealthy: How to Stay Healthy on a Budget

Couple of points:

  • The article mentions bodyweight exercises, but stops short of saying yoga or pilates?
  • Cooking for yourself will take time, but it’s worth it for health/nutrition by minimizing how much packaged food you consume.  Just be sure to wash the fruit & veg, eh? 😉
  • While you’re likely to pay more for better food, lowering body weight means portion control.  You’ll eat less, which will cost less.

Make Your Own Plant-Based Meal Replacement Powder to Save Money

I have a love/hate relationship with protein powder. I love that it helps make my daily smoothie more filling and meal-like. I love that it’s a quick and easy way to get a nice dose of the recovery-helping macronutrient after a hard workout.

But I hate the price. And I, more often than not, hate the ingredient list. There are definitely more natural protein powders out there, but the price is just so restrictively high! And the rare times I found a natural protein powder that wasn’t exorbitantly expensive, it was exorbitantly gritty, earthy, and generally not delicious.

Source: Homemade Plant Protein Powder

This is not “protein powder” – it is ground up legumes. It’s got more carbs in it than it does protein. Also eating raw lentils and raw rice is extremely problematical for a lot of people. They can actually interfere with the absorption of other nutrients.  Phytic acids can definitely be a concern for some folks (particularly raw vegan folks).

I would recommend to soak the rice and lentils first for few hours, drain the water and heat it in deep pan without adding anything until rice starts popping. Don’t forget to stir it continuously during heating to have uniform heat distribution. This should solve issue of rawness.

Otherwise, buy whey protein in bulk from vendors like Bulk Supplements or Powder City.  Generic protein powders with no brand name – they don’t cost as much, but they’re of the exact same quality (if not higher). They all come with Certificates of Analysis.

Speaking to those of us on blood thinners, based on previous information I highly recommend cooking the lentils vs raw.  There is vitamin K in lentils, just noticeably less if they’re cooked.  There’s vitamin K in brown rice as well, but a trivial amount.  There’s no vitamin K in steel cut oats.  Provided you cook the lentils and are OK the phytic acid, you should be OK.

I got a coffee/spice grinder years ago, for grinding sunflower, pumpkin, and sesame seeds that I use in breakfast.  I read a lot of reviews were available, and my assessment was that they were cheaper and replaceable.  Almost all reported failure at some point, so I just picked the best I could at a place with a great return policy.  So far, so good.

Crickets on the Menu, in Your Kitchen

Next Millennium Farms (NMF), located about 90 minutes outside of Toronto, Ontario, is part of a movement to introduce crickets — fried, baked, or milled into flour — to the North American menu. The insect’s nutritional benefits, combined with mounting concerns over the environmental impacts of meat production, is prompting conscious food producers to see the pest in a new light, turning cricket meal into everything from protein bars to cookies.

…”It’s chock-full of protein, has more iron than spinach, as much calcium as milk, all the amino acids, tons of omega 3, and tons of B12,” he says. “So not only does it taste good, it’s also unbelievably healthy.” The company expects to ship 3,000 pounds of flour in September alone; by year’s end, they predict that figure will rise to 10,000 pounds a month.

Source: I ate crickets because they’re the future of food

It’s a bit of a misnomer to call it “flour”, since it’s more akin to protein powder.  It’s currently quite expensive (comes out to $2.50/oz, or $.13/gram protein; vs protein powder’s $.72/oz or $.03/gram protein). I’m assuming it’s a young process, and they’re probably only in the beginning of getting the processing right/cost-optimized.