Deep-Frying Vegetables Can Actually Add Nutritional Value

You’ve probably heard that deep-frying is the absolute worst way to prepare anything ever, but a study published in Food Chemistry has found that it can actually add nutritional value to some vegetables.

Source: Deep-Frying Vegetables Can Actually Add Nutritional Value

Concerned about the amount of heat olive oil can tolerate (~400F)?  Just fry below the smoking point. In Spain, they use pure olive oil for fries instead of extra virgin because you can crank it higher.  When you fry at high temps, food absorbs less oil.  But I have no problem getting my fries nearly confitted with olive oil. Might be a bit soggy, but make them homefries!

How Ancient People Saved the Pumpkin from Extinction

The Great Pumpkin Shortage may have you grumbling over the price of mashed gourd this Thanksgiving, but if it weren’t for our distant ancestors, America’s favorite nutmeg latte scapegoat wouldn’t even exist.

Source: How Ancient People Saved the Pumpkin from Extinction

Same goes for the avocado, and more recently – the banana.

Pumpkin: How Much Vitamin K?

The good news is I found some nutritional data on the vitamin K content in pumpkins.  The bad news is that it’s not specific – there’s no knowing currently the vitamin K content of a sugar pumpkin is different from a Blue Hubbard, Butternut Squash, cheese pumpkin, Jarrahdale, Kabocha…  you get the idea.  Canned pumpkin could be any combination of, along with preservatives and whatever else.

According to this link:

  • 1 ounce/28 grams of “pumpkin” contains 0.3 mcg of vitamin K – 0% Daily Value (DV)
  • 3.5 ounces/100 grams of “pumpkin” contains 1.1 mcg of vitamin K – 1% DV
  • 1 cup/116 grams of “pumpkin” contains 1.3 mcg of vitamin K – 2% DV

If you’re making your own pumpkin puree for things like pie, cheesecake, curry, bread…  You’re pretty safe.  But remember that even low dose will add up if you eat seconds/thirds/etc.

The Best Pumpkin for Making Pies Isn’t the Sugar Pumpkin

…I don’t hate pumpkin pie. I just hate canned pumpkin pie. Here are the fresh pumpkins that made me finally see what I’d been missing.

Source: The Extra Step That Makes Pumpkin Pie Unforgettable

It’s really not that much more work to make your own, homemade pumpkin puree. Cut the pumpkin in quarters, scrape out the guts, roast for ~1 hour. Peel the skin off the flesh and toss it into the food processor with the rest of the ingredients.

Save Money by Making Your Own Pumpkin Spice Mix

As the leaves start to change color and cheery pumpkins show up on doorsteps, summer seems like a distant memory and we’re smack-dab in the middle of fall. And while pumpkin spice-flavored treats make their appearance just about, well, everywhere, do you even know what it contains? Here’s what it is and why you should make it at home. (Hint: It’s as easy as it gets!)

Source: How To Make Pumpkin Pie Spice

I spice my coffee with an equal parts mix of cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and pepper. It’s so good!  Very popular with tea and coffee in India. Crushed Black peppercorns are awesome in them.

This Is How Your Fruits and Vegetables Look in an MRI Machine

Hey! What are your plans for that artichoke you’ve got there? You’re going to grill it and serve it with some lemon-butter sauce? That’s cool. We’re just going to stick ours in this MRI machine here.

Source: This Is How Your Fruits and Vegetables Look in an MRI Machine

These pics are rather a-pealing.  Orange you glad you saw them?

The Teal Pumpkin Project: Food Allergy Awareness for Halloween

This Halloween, FARE is encouraging communities to start a new tradition that will help make this holiday season less scary for children with food allergies: the Teal Pumpkin Project. This campaign encourages people to raise awareness of food allergies by providing non-food treats for trick-or-treaters and painting a pumpkin teal – the color of food allergy awareness – to place in front of their house along with a free printable sign from FARE to indicate they have non-food treats available.

Source: The Teal Pumpkin Project

I’m surprised someone didn’t do this sooner.

Fall Foods that Benefit Your Skin and Hair

You may want to pause before gulping down that pumpkin spice latte. While everyone from Starbucks to Oreo wants you craving all pumpkin everything, there’s actually a healthy way to utilize the seasonal orange squash—the real stuff, not the sugar-high inducing, cinnamon spiked puree in a can.

You may have noticed pumpkin face masks and cranberry hair treatments flooding the beauty aisles, and while some are gimmicks capitalizing on your fall nostalgia, dermatologist Marnie Nussbaum says there are a few fall foods that can truly help your hair and skin when applied topically.

Source: Fall Foods that Benefit Your Skin and Hair