Rescue Overripe Fruit by Pureeing and Freezing It Into Flavor-Packed Cubes

…What I’m talking about is fruit that’s not quite at the point where it’s totally spoiled, but it’s not really enjoyable to eat out of hand anymore. The kind of fruit that looks past its prime; sort of wrinkled and worn. There’s more life in that produce than you might expect, so step away from the compost bin!

Source: Stop Wasting Overripe Fruit with This Smart, Simple Method

Keep in mind about Ice Cubes: The Shrinkage, Bad Taste and Freezer Burn.

The Best Pumpkin for Making Pies Isn’t the Sugar Pumpkin

…I don’t hate pumpkin pie. I just hate canned pumpkin pie. Here are the fresh pumpkins that made me finally see what I’d been missing.

Source: The Extra Step That Makes Pumpkin Pie Unforgettable

It’s really not that much more work to make your own, homemade pumpkin puree. Cut the pumpkin in quarters, scrape out the guts, roast for ~1 hour. Peel the skin off the flesh and toss it into the food processor with the rest of the ingredients.

Turn Overcooked Rice Into Tasty, Crispy Crackers

To me, “overcooked” usually means singed to a black, unrecognizable putrescence.  Followed by desperate soaking of the pot, before working with the roughest scrub bud I can find.  Rinse, repeat… 😉

But I admit – that does look really easy to do.  Add a dash of your favourite seasoning…  You can also make fish cakes out of the leftover rice, or make this simple soup.  Quickly rinse rice with a French Press (AKA Bodum) if you need to.  But be aware that there is arsenic in rice.

Freeze Whole Tomatoes Now to Preserve Their Flavor for Winter Sauces

Got tomatoes? Want to save them for winter sauces and stews — but without the hassle of canning? If you have the freezer space, preserve tomatoes with literally no work: Just freeze ’em!

Source: The Easiest Way to Preserve Tomatoes: Freeze Them!

I don’t have the freezer space 😦

Sweat Vegetables Before Making Soup for a Smoother, Creamier Texture

Sweating your veggies is easy: simply put your prepped vegetables in a pot on low heat. Keep the lid on, and let them cook slowly. By keeping the lid on, you use their own liquid to “sweat” (aka steam) them. The technique is called à l’étouffée in French cooking, and it leads to soups and bisques with depth of flavor. You can also apply this to purees that are part of other dishes—like mashed potatoes, for example.

Source: Sweat Vegetables Before Making Soup for a Smoother, Creamier Texture

Different Mincing Methods Can Affect the Taste of Garlic

The fact that microplaned garlic is more pungent than minced isn’t particularly shocking in and of itself. We all know that garlic’s intensity in a dish isn’t just dependent on how much garlic there is, but also how it’s been prepared: a single whole clove will deliver less intensity than a crushed one, a crushed clove will be milder than a sliced clove, and a sliced one isn’t as pungent as a chopped or pureed one—the more cells we rupture when cutting garlic, the more potent it is.

Source: The Best Way to Mince Garlic

Which you want depends on your tastes, and the recipe in question.