“Ancient Grains” Like Quinoa Are Trendier Than Wheat, But No Healthier

“Ancient grains” have been officially mainstream since January of this year, when they got their own Cheerios version. The likes of quinoa, spelt, and teff are turning up more and more, always with a hint that they’re healthier than boring old wheat or corn.

Source: “Ancient Grains” Like Quinoa Are Trendier Than Wheat, But No Healthier

I’m cool with diversity, but are people who dislike wheat because it’s industrially cultivated and intensively bred really pushing for ancient grains to become mainstream, thus being industrially cultivated and intensively bred?

There may well be environmental reasons to prefer these other grains, especially since some are more tolerant of drought or cold or whatever. But that’s definitely not why they’re in Cheerios, y’know?

The Best Way to Freeze Cooked Rice and Other Grains for Easier Reheating

For quicker weeknight meals, packages of pre-portioned cooked grains stashed in the freezer are one of our secret weapons. No waiting for rice or other grains to cook while your dinner companions prowl hungrily around the kitchen. No need to plan ahead. No need to do much more than pull a package out of the freezer and carry on with making the meal.

Source: How to Freeze & Thaw Rice, Quinoa & Other Whole Grains

The article says the vacuum sealer is optional, but seems like it’d be the weapon of choice.  A sealable plastic bag will take up less space in the freezer, and most importantly, it will thaw much more evenly later on. You won’t be left with frozen grains in the middle of your rice clump while the outside is ready to eat. You can also write the quantity and day it was cooked right on the bag.

9 Best New Proteins for Weight Loss

It burns fat. It builds muscle. And it tastes awesome.

It’s easy to love protein. All of our favorite foods — burgers, steaks, pork chops, bacon — are  packed with it. And with the ever-growing popularity of whey-protein shakes, we’re taking in more of this essential muscle maker than ever before.

But are we eating the right kind?

Source: 9 Best New Proteins for Weight Loss

The article mentions a “complete protein”, which I understood to have been debunked.  Much as I love hummus, it is high in calories.  I did hemp seeds for a while, but trendy stuff costs.  You can get as much by combining sesame, sunflower and pumpkin seeds…

The Most Overrated “Healthy” Foods (and What to Eat Instead)

Sometimes a food becomes trendy based on health claims that, as it turns out, the food can’t really support. Here’s a look at a few superfoods that aren’t so super—and suggest some alternatives that are healthier, cheaper, or both.

Now, as a fan of all food, I want to be clear that all of these are delicious and many are nutritious, so it’s not like you have to stop eating them if you love them. These foods made the list because they tend to be hyped with health claims. In each case, either the food’s nutritional information doesn’t support the claim, doesn’t support it as well as other, less-hyped foods, or the food has other health concerns that make it less than virtuous.

Source: The Most Overrated “Healthy” Foods (and What to Eat Instead)

Only acai berries are said to have vitamin K, but I can’t find any actual information on how much vitamin K.  So if you binge on acai berries, I’d recommend reading the article for alternatives.

If you’re after protein, there’s better sources than quinoa.  Navy beans and black beans for instance, if you’re adverse to steak.  The complete protein is a lie

20 Filling Foods That Help You Lose Weight

While you might find some of the research that follows surprising, there are no magic potions or super bars on this list. They’re all nutrient-rich whole foods, which a recent study revealed increase calorie burning by roughly 50% compared to processed foods, adds Sass. Eating less without feeling like you’re on a diet and burning more calories? We’ll take it.

Source: 20 Filling Foods That Help You Lose Weight

Of the list, the majority are accessible to those of us on warfarin/coumadin.  Apples, pears, lentils, and leeks are a concern but can be tolerated in small doses without a huge impact.  I don’t see anyone consuming lemons though…  Kimchi was a surprise.