What to Smell for to Check if Your Oil Is Rancid

“Rancid.” Even the word sounds gross. Or at the very least, like a super-angry punk band. Either way, it’s definitely not how you’d want anyone to describe the food you’re eating. The first step to side-stepping rancidity? Know your enemy.

Source: How to Tell If Your Food Is Rancid (Ew)

Don’t start putting your olive oil in the fridge – it will solidify, and then you can’t use it. Just keep it away from direct heat, keep it sealed, and away from light. As long as you go through it at a reasonable rate, you should be okay.

Whole-Grain Flour Has a Short Shelf Life, So Freeze It

Let’s just say you were unable to resist the temptation of the bulk bin aisle, and you’ve arrived home with a half-dozen baggies filled with everything from quinoa flour to einkorn. These things happen, but not to worry, because you have plans — big plans! — for baking all sorts of wondrous things in the coming weeks.

Okay, you eager-beaver baker, you — do you know where you should be storing all your lovely bags of whole-grain flour until your schedule clears? Do you know why?

Source: Why You Should Probably Be Storing Your Whole-Grain Flours in the Freezer

Why should I care about it being in an air-tight container? Because even in the freezer, the fats will react (slowly) with oxygen and become rancid. In an air-tight container, the oxygen level will eventually drop too low for the reaction to continue, thus preserving the flour for a longer time than flour stored in the freezer and constantly exposed to fresh oxygen.

On the flip side, whole grain wheat has a shelf live of over 30 years if properly prepared, sealed and stored.  Just add a grinder for flour.