A New High-Res 3D Printer Can Print Objects Smaller Than Blood Cells

On June 15, a team of researchers at UNIST has announced that they have developed a high-resolution 3D printing technology that is capable of printing electronic circuits on plastic, metallic or magnetic nanoparticles that are curved and much flexible. According to the team, led by Prof. Jang-Ung Park (School of Materials Science and Engineering), they have succeeded in imprinting ultra-fine 3D patterns that are as small as 0.001 mm in size. This is thinner than a red blood cell.

Source: Realizing Futuristic 3D Printing Technology

The article talks about wearable electronics, but I wonder if something like skin would be possible.  Rather than grafting…

Sure, cost is upwards of $50,000.  But that’s now – eventually the cost will come down.  The size of the unit isn’t mentioned, as shipping one to the space station (or other remote places) might make some things more accessible.

Stretching After Exercise: Does it Aid in Recovery?

Learn about the body’s adaptations to different types of post-workout activities. Did you know that serious stretching after a workout is contraindicated for recovery? Instead, avoid serious stretching after training and use a mild exercise to cool down.

Source: Stretching After Exercise: Does it Aid in Recovery?

I’ve done yoga for years, and recently started to practice on my own because it’s been difficult to find a class that meshes with my schedule.  I’ve never used it for recovery, and “restorative” classes are not for me.  The primary focus has been strength and flexibility – my hamstrings love to shrink.  And I’m under the impression I have scoliosis (I recently found out this is just a term for back curvature, it’s not just congenital) so while I don’t feel twists I experience the benefit in a portion of my lower back that constantly needs realignment.  I believe I’ve experienced an improvement in both running and cycling from doing warrior related postures…  While it might not be recovery in the sense that the article talks about, the experiences since I started practicing more regularly suggest it was a good idea.  It helps that I like doing it too.

Guide to Decoding Your Blood Test Results

Spoiler alert: They don’t mention INR.

Apart from the puzzling jargon, the design of bloodwork lab reports is dismal. Wonderful makeovers have been envisioned, but until they’re in use, we’re stuck deciphering highly technical and administrative-looking documents that make tax forms look like an ecard from mom.

But have no fear. You can become literate in your blood test results. Our guide isn’t a comprehensive glossary of technical terms, but it provides basic definitions and a better overall visual sense of how the information on a typical blood test report is presented and organized so you can interpret your blood work with confidence.

Source: The Ultimate Guide to Decoding Your Blood Test Results

Hypochonriacs: Just because something is outside the normal range, does not mean its something to worry about. A lot of times things will be transient and things are often technically abnormal when they aren’t actually clinically significant. For example some people have very low blood pressure, but unless you’re having symptoms of low blood pressure most doctors would not give it a second though.

The article mentions hangry, which has been covered before.