Bats Played a Crucial Role in Evolution of Hepatitis Virus

There are plenty of diseases that we contract from animals, but scientists were convinced that hepatitis A wasn’t one of them. A look at other diseases shows us that we’re wrong—and that bats played a part in passing on the disease to humans.

Source: Bats Played a Crucial Role in Evolution of Hepatitis Virus

So… how did hepatitis make the jump from bats to humans?  I guess if we lived in caves, otherwise rodents make more sense.

Iron Is Better Than Fluoride At Preventing Cavities, But There’s A Catch

Materials scientists studying beavers have discovered why the crafty rodents never get cavities: the enamel in their teeth is rich in iron. Iron, they found, resists acid more effectively than fluoride.

Source: Iron Is Better Than Fluoride At Preventing Cavities, But There’s A Catch

…which means beaver teeth will have a reddish tinge to it.  From the blood of their enemies! 😉

Why Do People Still Get the Plague?

People don’t die of the Black Plague in the 21st century — except when they do. And the disease won’t be going away any time soon.

Earlier this month, a high school student in Colorado died of the disease. On average, seven people in the U.S. catch the plague every year; some years, it’s only one, and in other years, it’s as many as 17. Worldwide, the plague strikes about 2,000 people every year, and about 10% of them will die. That’s quite a step down for the disease that killed nearly a third of the population of Medieval Europe in its heyday. But why hasn’t the plague faded quietly into the history books?

Source: Why Do People Still Get the Plague?

Lest we forget the story of WHO wanting to announce that malaria had been eradicated.  But the press release couldn’t happen, because the speaker came ill …with malaria. 😉