The 20 Best Full-Fat Foods for Weight Loss

…now I can get fat 😀

It’s time to get fat.

Not around your waist, but on your plate: A new report from the Credit Suisse Research Institute found that more and more of us are choosing whole-fat foods over skim, lite, fat-free or other modern monikers of leanness. And while many health organizations like the American Heart Association still want us to cut down on fat—particularly saturated fat—this full-fat trend may be a healthy rebellion against those decades-old credos, according to recent studies.

Source: The 20 Best Full-Fat Foods for Weight Loss

The article fails to mention why fat is good in our diet: fat soluble vitamin uptake is greatly improved when consumed with fat.  So I don’t know why they listed protein as something that is improved by eating fat…

Be mindful of how much vitamin K there is in the suggested foods:

Does a Diet of Chestnuts Really Flavor the Meat of a Pig?

Those of us watching Hannibal know that when Hannibal feeds someone chestnuts, it’s a warning sign. Supposedly a diet of chestnuts flavors meat. Let’s look at several studies on the subject (done with pigs, not humans) and try to determine if that’s true.

Source: Does a Diet of Chestnuts Really Flavor the Meat of a Pig?

What’s interesting is that some will warn about this for those with nut allergies.  I don’t know if it is actually a risk, but who wants to find out?

Typical American Diet Can Damage Immune System

…Many reports have observed that heavier patients appear more likely to come down with infections during a hospital stay, acquire weaker protection from vaccinations and, as with River, suffer more complications from the flu.

Weight alone may not be the entire explanation. A tantalizing line of evidence suggests that unhealthful foods — fatty, salty, sugary, processed foods — may disrupt the body’s defenses in a way that promotes inflammation, infection, autoimmune diseases and even illnesses like cancer.

Source: Typical American diet can damage immune system

I think it was QI (highly recommended) where I heard about the study into hereditary genetics, how what grandparents ate was believed to affect grandchildren.

Can Noodles Ever Be Healthy? Here’s The Lowdown On 10 Types

Traditional pasta has gotten a bad rap (high in carbs, full of white flour). But there are lots of other noodles on the market that can actually be — dare we say it — good for you.

“They may look and taste similar, but noodles can be made from many different raw ingredients — from wheat to buckwheat to seaweed — and their nutritional benefits vary,” nutritionist Jessica Marcus, MS, RD, tells Yahoo Health. But no matter which you choose, watch your portion sizes. “Between half a cup to a cup of cooked noodles should satisfy you without overloading your blood sugar,” Marcus says.

Here’s the 411 on which of these squirmy, squiggly edibles you should put on the dinner table, and which ones you should leave behind.

Source: Can Noodles Ever Be Healthy? Here’s The Lowdown On 10 Types

Brief rundown of each type, but rare informational.  I don’t make much pasta to know how available some of the types are, but that’s likely to be different between various chains and such.

The aspect of calories and carbs can be dealt with via portioning.  There’s lots of articles online suggesting that most cook too much pasta when portioning for meals like spaghetti.

Researchers Slam 30-Year-Old Guidelines On Fatty Foods

Guidelines warning people to avoid eating fatty foods such as butter and cheese should not have been introduced, new research has found.

Dietary advice issued to tens of millions warned that fat consumption should be strictly limited to cut the risk of heart disease and death.  But experts say the recommendations, which have been followed for the past 30 years, were not backed up by scientific evidence and should never have been issued.

Source: Fat guidelines lacked any solid scientific evidence, study concludes

This study didn’t dismiss the saturated fat and heart disease correlation, though a study has demonstrated there is no link.  This also lends more weight to why the Mediterranean Diet is so healthy

On a related note: salt is not poison. Low sodium intake has been associated with an increased risk of stroke, in spite of what almost all doctors are taught, in at least two studies. There is little or no evidence that sodium intake increases the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). A high salt intake can increase your blood pressure, which is in fact a risk factor for CVD, but if your blood pressure is under control then salt is not necessarily a factor. It also seems that not having enough sodium may in fact be a risk factor for stroke.

Are some diets “mass murder”?

From low fat to Atkins and beyond, diets that are based on poor nutrition science are a type of global, uncontrolled experiment that may lead to bad outcomes, concludes Richard Smith

Jean Mayer, one of the “greats” of nutrition science, said in 1965, in the colourful language that has characterised arguments over diet, that prescribing a diet restricted in carbohydrates to the public was “the equivalent of mass murder.” Having ploughed my way through five books on diet and some of the key studies to write this article, I’m left with the impression that the same accusation of “mass murder” could be directed at many players in the great diet game. In short, bold policies have been based on fragile science, and the long term results may be terrible.

Source: Are some diets “mass murder”?

A large part of the article is about the Keys “research” in the 1950’s about fat in our diet.  As recently posted – an increase saturated fat food does NOT show increase in fat in the blood.  To claim “mass murder” when there’s no change in heart disease outcomes is overly dramatic.  Science gets better as time goes on to reshape how and why we do things, and there will always be political machinations…

Study: Increase Saturated Fat Food Does NOT Show Increase in Blood

Doubling or even nearly tripling saturated fat in the diet does not drive up total levels of saturated fat in the blood, according to a controlled diet study.

However, increasing levels of carbohydrates in the diet during the study promoted a steady increase in the blood of a fatty acid linked to an elevated risk for diabetes and heart disease.

The finding “challenges the conventional wisdom that has demonized saturated fat and extends our knowledge of why dietary saturated fat doesn’t correlate with disease,” said senior author Jeff Volek, a professor of human sciences at The Ohio State University.

Source: Study: Doubling Saturated Fat in the Diet Does Not Increase Saturated Fat in Blood

Emphasis is mine!  Not the first time with news that Low-Carb > Low-Fat diet.

“There is no magical carb level, no cookie-cutter approach to diet, that works for everyone,” he said. “There’s a lot of interest in personalized nutrition, and using a dynamically changing biomarker could provide some index as to how the body is processing carbohydrates.”

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.

That, more or less, is the short answer to the supposedly incredibly complicated and confusing question of what we humans should eat in order to be maximally healthy. I hate to give away the game right here at the beginning of a long essay, and I confess that I’m tempted to complicate matters in the interest of keeping things going for a few thousand more words. I’ll try to resist but will go ahead and add a couple more details to flesh out the advice. Like: A little meat won’t kill you, though it’s better approached as a side dish than as a main. And you’re much better off eating whole fresh foods than processed food products. That’s what I mean by the recommendation to eat “food.” Once, food was all you could eat, but today there are lots of other edible food like substances in the supermarket. These novel products of food science often come in packages festooned with health claims, which brings me to a related rule of thumb: if you’re concerned about your health, you should probably avoid food products that make health claims. Why? Because a health claim on a food product is a good indication that it’s not really food, and food is what you want to eat.

Source: Unhappy Meals