Upgrade Boring Bread Crumbs by Sauteing Them in Butter and Herbs

It’s a focused reverence that most chefs reserve for, say, caviar. Their signature rye crumbs are meant as a finishing touch—loaded with toasty, herby flavor to crown everything from braised chicken to long-cooked vegetables. “We treat them like you would a piece of meat, cooking them in oil, butter, and aromatics,” Carbone says. “They’re perfect for bringing another layer of texture and flavor to a dish that’s already been fully cooked.”

Source: Cook Your Breadcrumbs Like You Cook Meat (Oil, Butter, Aromatics)

  • Can we generalize this by just saying everything gets better when sauteed with a half stick of butter?
  • The first step is about crushing the breadcrumbs, but a food processor would be a lot easier

😉

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For Richer Scrambled Eggs, Use Sour Cream Instead of Milk

…assuming you use dairy products.  There is vitamin K in sour cream, but you take a lesson from Gordon Ramsey and use Crème Fraîche – which supposedly does not have any vitamin K:

Greek yogurt is another alternative, and my recipe calls for water so as not to alienate the lactose intolerant.  The taste/texture hasn’t been an issue to me – I usually add sauteed mushrooms & onions, grape/cherry tomatoes, and sriracha.  Almost an omelette, and some originally were planned to be omelettes… 😉

Cooking: Doesn’t ‘Burn Off’ The Alcohol In Food

If you’re worried about getting boozy in front of your fiancée’s parents over the holidays, it’s not just the eggnog you should be watching.

As it turns out, many popular foods prepared with wine or liquor never have the alcohol completely cooked out. New Scientist deputy editor Graham Lawton tried it out for himself by eating several dishes sautéed, flambéed, or baked with booze. After each plate he consumed (an appetizer, a main course, and a dessert), Lawton measured his blood alcohol content.

Source: Cooking Doesn’t Actually ‘Burn Off’ The Alcohol In Food

There’s a handy chart in the article to compare how much alcohol content is retained in certain foods using various cooking times and methods.  A previous post covers non-alcoholic substitutions.