Skip the Handshake and Fist Bump Instead to Keep From Getting Sick

Indirect transfer via surfaces such as computer keyboards and door handles is a potential route of transmission for infectious diseases and efforts are made to control such transfer, particularly in hospitals.  However, direct contact between individuals has the potential for greater efficiency of pathogen transmission, and handshakes are known to transmit bacteria, including potential pathogens.  Nevertheless, some social/professional contexts place great value in the handshake and its quality.  Indeed, health professionals have been specifically encouraged to offer handshakes to meet patients’ expectations and to develop a rapport with them.

Source: The fist bump: A more hygienic alternative to the handshake

It’ll take a while for culture to accept this without thinking you’re desperate to look current. 😉

How Altitude Sickness Affects Your Body And How You Can Beat It

Altitude sickness can make you dizzy, nauseous, and, in extreme cases, can even kill you. All of us at IndefinitelyWild have experienced it. Here’s what we’ve learned and how you can minimize its symptoms.

Source: How Altitude Sickness Affects Your Body And How You Can Beat It

Definitely something I wanted to learn about, but give the risk factors for high altitude edema (pulmonary and cerebral) – I don’t think anyone’s doctor will condone such activity for those of us on blood thinners.  Stick to GoPro footage 😉

Looking At Sick People Primes Your Immune System

If, on the way to your desk, you pass that one person in the office who absolutely won’t go home, even though their face is exploding with mucus, don’t count on a day off. Just looking at sick people can kick your immune system into gear.

Source: Looking At Sick People Primes Your Immune System

Works for germs and food…

The Myth of Vitamin C and the Common Cold

You’ve probably heard it a zillion times: take some vitamin C if you feel a cold coming on, and chase away illness with a gallon of orange juice. Even though we know there’s no cure for the common cold, many of us still believe in the sweet, orange elixir and don’t even question what the makers of the stuff guarantee: an 8 oz. glass delivers “100% of the vitamin C” needed to “maintain a healthy immune system.”

Science-ish looked at high-quality studies on the subject of vitamin C and sickness, starting with this recent Cochrane systematic review (the highest form of evidence) on the supplement for prevention and treatment of the common cold. The lead author, Dr. Harri Hemilä, of the department of public health at the University of Helsinki, told Science-ish he has spent much of his career exploring this very question—with some interesting results.

…there is good evidence it has benefits for one specific group of people: those who undertake really intense physical activity such as marathon runners. For them, vitamin C supplementation decreases the incidence of colds by half. These findings, though, do not hold up for ordinary people, Dr. Hemilä emphasized.

Source: The myth of Vitamin C and the common cold

All is not lost – vitamin C is good for:

  • free radical protection
  • collagen production
  • brain health

…and there are better sources than oranges.

Study: The Coffee Pot has the Most Germs

If you’re in a shared office environment, you probably wash you hands after using the restroom. That’s good hygiene, but you might consider washing your hands after touching the coffee pot. A recent study determined that it’s a “hot zone” in your office.

Source: The Most Germ-Infested Item in the Office Might Be the Coffee Pot

Anything that multiple people come into contact with is cause for germ exposure.  The handles for the hot/cold water, the door knob… Telephones too, but personal cell phones are putting a dent in that.  On a related note, the fist bump is more healthy than shaking hands because although contact is being made – it’s not where most of the germs are.

Hipster CDC Reports Flu Epidemic Peaked Years Ago

If you’re already sick, or feel like something is coming on – look to eat foods high in vitamin C.  There are foods with higher concentrations of vitamin C than oranges, and they’re low in vitamin K (if any at all).

Don’t forget that we live because of symbiosis with bacteria