There’s Skin Bacteria in Cemetery Soil—Here’s Why

Did you know that, according to Polish law, graves can be reused after 20 years, provided nobody objects and the burial fee has not been paid? After reading this scientific paper on soil contaminants around cemeteries, you will.

Source: There’s Skin Bacteria in Cemetery Soil—Here’s Why

I want my ashes thrown in the faces of all the people I didn’t like or that wronged me. Vengeance is mine!

There’s Lead in Your Farm, But Here’s How to Get It Out

Urban farmers who have their soil tested for heavy metals and other contaminants can get a nasty shock when they realize what would be coursing through the food they grow on their land. Establish an innocent little vegetable patch and you’ll be serving your family a salad full of fresh lead.

Happily, contaminated soil doesn’t mean farming is out of the question. A relatively small investment in compost and new topsoil can mean a relatively large drop in contaminants. Some urban farmers put in raised beds that keep the plants they intend to eat out of contact with the soil. And then there’s another solution: phytoremediation.

Source: There’s Lead in Your Farm, But Here’s How to Get It Out

I do not recommend eating Indian mustard, or mustard greens in general.  3.5 oz/100 grams of mustard greens contains 592.7 mcg of vitamin K, or 564% of the Daily Value (DV).

Same recommendation goes for Chinese cabbage.  100 grams of Chinese cabbage contains 42.9 mcg of vitamin K, or 54% DV.  It’s not as bad for us as mustard greens, but certainly higher than most what I’ve profiled to date.