Use Chickpea Liquid to Make the Fluffiest Egg-Free Pancakes Ever

Recipes and techniques generally advance in baby steps. It’s rare that you find a technique so far out of left field that it changes the way people think about food overnight. Sous vide cooking is up there, as is no-knead bread. In the world of vegan cuisine, nothing has shaken things up like aquafaba—the recently coined term for the liquid inside a can of cooked beans. It’s the kind of technique that’s so mind-blowingly simple that I’m amazed nobody discovered it until just a couple of years ago.

Source: Use Aquafaba to Make Extra-Light, Fluffy Egg-Free or Vegan Pancakes

I discovered aquafaba with a recipe for two ingredient meringues a few months ago. It has since nearly completely replaced my use of prepackaged egg substitutes. I am eating a lot more chickpeas now as a result. I’ve also found that canned chickpeas freeze well and defrost quickly.

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Make Whipped Cream That Lasts by Adding Sour Cream

Now I always make my whipped cream in advance, with a little help from sour cream (and science).

Source: How to Make Whipped Cream Ahead of Time

You could add mascarpone and a small amount of powdered sugar to stabilize it. Tastes awesome, held it’s shape and didn’t weep/lose any moisture.  A little unflavoured gelatin would work too.

Five Simple Buttermilk Substitutions for Batters and Baked Goods

Maybe you don’t want to buy buttermilk for a recipe that calls for just half a cup of it, or maybe you’ve already started cooking and just realized you need buttermilk and don’t have any. Nothing matches the pure taste of buttermilk exactly, and if you really want to taste that flavor—if you’re making dip perhaps—you should try and stick with the real thing. But if you’re baking or making pancakes, don’t worry about using a substitute.

Source: The Best Buttermilk Substitutes

My five – they forgot milk + lemon juice.  Someone claimed it was vegan… but it is vegetarian, depending on your practice.

Sour Cream, Crema, Crème Fraîche: What’s the Difference?

The headline makes me think of Seinfeld: “What’s the…”  But I digress…

Sour cream, crema, and crème fraîche: these three dairy products are often used to add a cool lusciousness and body to foods like potatoes, salads, and nachos. But while all three products are made the same way—by adding friendly bacteria to heavy cream—they’re all technically different ingredients.

Source: Sour Cream, Crema, Crème Fraîche: What’s the Difference?

While we’re here, might as well address vitamin K content…

Sour cream contains:

  • 1.8 mcg of vitamin K per 100 grams – that’s 2% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • 4.1 mcg of vitamin K per 1 cup/240 grams – 5%

I couldn’t even find information on crema – every search engine thinks I misspelt “cream”.  Sigh…

Crème Fraîche, according to sources, has 0 mcg of vitamin K.

If you consume in consistent quantity and frequency, you’re fine because your blood thinner medication dose already has it taken into account.  But depending on the amount you consume and timing just before an INR test, there’s a chance you could have a conversation with your doctor about changing your dose and testing again in the near future.

This for That: Cooking & Baking Substitutes

Direct link to infographic.

Some stuff seems OK – it breaks out the component ingredients for things that are frequently bought as a combination, like poultry seasoning. The rest, though? They are not even close and would produce an entirely different thing in a lot of cases.  But then, that’s typically the challenge when trying to “veganize” and/or make a recipe gluten free for example.

…or you could just buy the actual ingredients 😉