This Video Debunks 10 Misconceptions About Your Favorite Beverages

To be clear – tap water is more heavily regulated than bottled water, and the presenter makes sure to say that the actual water quality depends on location (obviously Flint and WV are outliers).

Why Lead Is Bad For Humans

Given that humans have been using lead in various product for over 8,000 years (with the first known mining of it in Anatolia around 6500 BCE), you might be surprised to learn that we have known that lead is dangerous and shouldn’t be trifled with since at least 150 BC, when its effects on the human body were noted by famed Greek physician Nicander of Colophon. Nicander even went so far as to describe the metal as “deadly”, writing extensively on the crippling effects it has on the human body in his work, Alexipharmaca.

Source: Why is Lead Bad For Humans?

Part of the reason for so many jokes about slack jawed yokels, pre-meth era, was that cider presses and stills tended to be made of lead.

Study: Pesticides May Be Killing Off Your Sperm

Men who consume the pesticide residue found in many fruits and vegetables may have nearly 50 percent lower sperm count, according to a paper published in the journal Human Reproduction. The study, conducted by a team of Harvard researchers, is the first to examine the link between pesticide consumption and reproductive health.

Source: Pesticides May Be Killing Off Your Sperm

They didn’t actually address pesticides directly. They asked each man what he ate, then went to a USDA database to estimate their pesticide consumption based on what fruits and vegetables they ate Different fruits and vegetables have different amounts of pesticides residues. No specific pesticide was measured or estimated, just pesticide residue in general.

The men were also selected in a biased fashion, as they were all a part of couples seeking fertility treatment.  The observed sperm count was 50 % lower with men estimated to have consumed the most pesticides, so it was a pretty pronounced effect. This finding is consistent with other studies that showed that agricultural workers who work directly with pesticides have a lower sperm count.  However the study size was small (~150 men), and they did not actually measure pesticide exposure or pesticide metabolites.