Why You Shouldn’t Drink Water After Eating Spicy Foods

My uncle had some tomato plants on his patio that a squirrel would constantly steal.  My uncle finally got fed up with the varmint, he put a habanero plant right next to his tomato plants.  Sure enough, an hour later, he heard a bunch of flopping happening on his patio. The squirrel was all over the place and a partially eaten habanero was laying on the floor.

The squirrel didn’t return to take anything more from the patio. 😀

Peppers in Diet Linked to Lower Risk of Death

Eating spicy food frequently is linked to a lower risk of death in a Chinese study, adding heat to the debate on whether people should eat chilies for health benefits.

The study involved 487,375 people aged 30 to 79 across China. Half were followed for 7.2 years. Over the study period, there were 20,224 deaths.

Those who said they ate spicy food once or twice a week showed a 10 per cent reduced overall risk of dying, compared with people who ate spicy foods less often.

…In the study, the association was stronger among people who didn’t drink alcohol.

Source: Chili peppers in diet linked to lower risk of death

The article doesn’t mention that peppers are generally a source of calcium (though not much good without vitamin D to process it if you aren’t going outside), and vitamin C, folate, and iron. No vitamin K to speak of.  What makes up the rest of the diet is also important, but the article is extremely vague (or potentially misleading) as chili peppers are a particular type vs habanero, jalapeno, bell…

Eat healthy, exercise regularly, die anyways 😉

Some Like it Hot: Men Who Enjoy Spicy Food Have Higher Testosterone Levels

Men who enjoy spicy food – are you also balding? 😉

Not everyone may have a strong threshold for spicy food. Some don’t even have the guts to partake of food dashed with chili or chili sauce because of the unbearably tingling hotness they bring to the palate. However, for men who enjoy spicy food, they were also observed to have elevated testosterone levels, according to a new study.

Source: Men Who Enjoy Spicy Food Have Higher Testosterone Levels: Report

The article says it’s only correlation – that eating spicy food is a risky/adventurous habit/stunt, so it’s unlikely that eating more spicy food will increase your testosterone levels if so inclined.

Why We Love the Pain of Spicy Food

…the chili sensation isn’t just warm: It hurts! It is a form of pain and irritation. There’s no obvious biological reason why humans should tolerate it, let alone seek it out and enjoy it. For centuries, humans have eagerly consumed capsaicin—the molecule that generates the heat sensation—even though nature seems to have created it to repel us.

Like our affection for a hint of bitterness in cuisine, our love of spicy heat is the result of conditioning. The chili sensation mimics that of physical heat, which has been a constant element of flavor since the invention of the cooking fire: We have evolved to like hot food. The chili sensation also resembles that of cold, which is unpleasant to the skin but pleasurable in drinks and ice cream, probably because we have developed an association between cooling off and the slaking of thirst. But there’s more to it than that.

Source: Why We Love the Pain of Spicy Food

There is the argument that eating spicy food is beneficial in hotter climates (closer you get to the equator) because it provokes sweating, cooling you off. Which makes sense that the rats in the studies would not take to consuming spicy food – rats, like dogs, do not sweat.

Spices, not just spicy ones, had been used for  preservation (including bacteria killing) before refrigeration became possible.