How Ancient People Saved the Pumpkin from Extinction

The Great Pumpkin Shortage may have you grumbling over the price of mashed gourd this Thanksgiving, but if it weren’t for our distant ancestors, America’s favorite nutmeg latte scapegoat wouldn’t even exist.

Source: How Ancient People Saved the Pumpkin from Extinction

Same goes for the avocado, and more recently – the banana.

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Microwave a Complete Spaghetti Squash Dinner In 15 Minutes

Your favorite pasta impersonator just got a whole lot easier to make. In about 15 minutes in the microwave, you can turn a rock-hard spaghetti squash into a bowl of tender “noodles,” ready for some sauce. I’ll even throw in a trick for making it easier to slice the squash in half. What are you waiting for?

Source: How to Cook Spaghetti Squash In the Microwave

Typically I just quarter it, remove any seeds, etc and throw it in some boiling water for ~10 minutes. Pull them out, let them cool, hand squeeze the water out, and use a fork to pull the noodles.

I also love cutting acorn squash in half, adding a little butter and throwing it in the microwave for a minute or two. It’s already in a bowl and it’s really easy to clean up.

Quick Pickle Pretty Much Anything with One Simple Ratio

Ask me what I’d do with nearly any summer vegetable, and the answer is almost always the same: “Pickle it.” Yellow squash, pickle it. Green beans, pickle them. Cherries, pickle those too. It’s hard to beat the sharp tang and crisp snap of a good quick pickle, a fast and easy process that leaves them tasting of summer.

Source: How to Pickle Basically Everything

I’ll have to make room by eating the oven roasted peppers I did a while back…

Sioux Chef Revives Native American Tastes of Yesteryear

…Sherman has studied the diets of Native Americans before European influence and assimilation, experimented with pre-colonized flavors and ingredients and served as the executive chef at a popular restaurant in the Twin Cities. Now the 40-year-old plans to do what few have done: open a purely indigenous restaurant that focuses solely on pre-colonization Sioux and Ojibwe cuisine.

…“I’m not pushing healthy food but traditional food,” he said. “It’s traditional food in a modern context, and it just happens to be healthy.”

Source: Sioux chef revives Native American tastes of yesteryear

Good luck to them.  I think there’s more money to be made in a cookbook than a restaurant.

LA Times Does Series on Exploitation of Mexican Farmworkers

It’s a four part series –

The tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers arrive year-round by the ton, with peel-off stickers proclaiming “Product of Mexico.”

Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers. American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.

These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.

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Fall Foods that Benefit Your Skin and Hair

You may want to pause before gulping down that pumpkin spice latte. While everyone from Starbucks to Oreo wants you craving all pumpkin everything, there’s actually a healthy way to utilize the seasonal orange squash—the real stuff, not the sugar-high inducing, cinnamon spiked puree in a can.

You may have noticed pumpkin face masks and cranberry hair treatments flooding the beauty aisles, and while some are gimmicks capitalizing on your fall nostalgia, dermatologist Marnie Nussbaum says there are a few fall foods that can truly help your hair and skin when applied topically.

Source: Fall Foods that Benefit Your Skin and Hair