For Young Men, Eating Disorders Aren’t Always So Obvious

When Nate Nahmias was 16, he decided that he wanted to get fit.

A math- and science-oriented kid, he applied his analytical know-how to his workout regimen and diet. He meticulously planned each lift and run, and ensured every single calorie he consumed was accounted for. But he had a hard time keeping track of it all himself, so he asked his mother to set up an appointment with a dietitian. “I thought that maybe the dietitian would have some tools to help me stay on track with what I wanted,” Nahmias, now 25, tells Yahoo Health. “I thought she would applaud me for all of my hard work and strict diet.

Source: For Young Men, Eating Disorders Aren’t Always So Obvious

I have a very clear distaste for the thinking that things are distinct to a particular gender.

I’ve certainly known proactive guys with body issues who got into weights to attain the physique they idealize.  I figure that some likely would meet the criteria of having an eating disorder, but the behaviour got addressed as they came to learn about nutrition.  For me, before nutrition it was the fact I’d “reward” myself and eat back all the gains I’d made.  Similar goals, it’s about finding what works best for ourselves in order to make progress.

Do You Suffer From ‘Exploding Head Syndrome’? You’re Not Alone

Get your head out of the gutter.  Or was that premature? 😉

New findings indicate nearly one in five college-age students has been startled awake by an abrupt, loud noise that doesn’t actually exist. Known as “exploding head syndrome,” the psychological condition appears to be more common and disruptive than previously thought.

Source: Do You Suffer From ‘Exploding Head Syndrome’? You’re Not Alone.

I identify with the symptoms, but don’t fall in the demographic.  But that’s part of the research – better refinement and understanding.

It’s also a good moment to remind ourselves that hearing voices is not a sign of mental illness.  There are a wide range of experiences for people who hear voices, and that many of them don’t fit the typical definitions.  A large issue with this is stigma.  Our culture is quick to judge and subsequently dismiss/marginalize (if not ostracize) such people.