Stretching Prevents Injury, and Other Misconceptions About Exercise

This does need a YMMV disclaimer unfortunately.  Cold static vs warm static pre workout stretch varies in terms of efficacy for many, and the six month rule shoe rule is in play for most marathoners, and may even be less depending on whether you rock a stability type of shoe, etc.

This Guide Shows Which Muscles You Work When You’re Stretching

It doesn’t matter  if you’re a chronic sitter, a daily exerciser, or a weekend warrior, you must know that stretching is a critical habit. With sending blood stream in your muscles and offering your joints help with moving through their full scope of movement, stretching enhances your stance and athletic execution while lowering your danger of torment and harm.

However when you do yoga or an adaptability schedule, do you know which muscles you’re really extending? On the other hand whether you’re performing every stretch accurately?

Source: 36 Pictures to See Which Muscle You’re Stretching

The truth about stretching is it’s not always beneficial.

Why Your Muscles Get Sore (and What You Can Do About It)

When you’re struggling to walk down the stairs the day after a tough workout, should you view your soreness as proof you worked hard, or as a sign you overdid it? The truth is somewhere in between. Let’s learn about where soreness comes from and how to keep it from making you miserable.

Source: Why Your Muscles Get Sore (and What You Can Do About It)

One of the suggestions to combat soreness is ibuprofen – do not do this on blood thinners, at least not before reading about it.

Stretching After Exercise: Does it Aid in Recovery?

Learn about the body’s adaptations to different types of post-workout activities. Did you know that serious stretching after a workout is contraindicated for recovery? Instead, avoid serious stretching after training and use a mild exercise to cool down.

Source: Stretching After Exercise: Does it Aid in Recovery?

I’ve done yoga for years, and recently started to practice on my own because it’s been difficult to find a class that meshes with my schedule.  I’ve never used it for recovery, and “restorative” classes are not for me.  The primary focus has been strength and flexibility – my hamstrings love to shrink.  And I’m under the impression I have scoliosis (I recently found out this is just a term for back curvature, it’s not just congenital) so while I don’t feel twists I experience the benefit in a portion of my lower back that constantly needs realignment.  I believe I’ve experienced an improvement in both running and cycling from doing warrior related postures…  While it might not be recovery in the sense that the article talks about, the experiences since I started practicing more regularly suggest it was a good idea.  It helps that I like doing it too.