The Asparagus-Urine Smell Is Surprisingly Controversial

Most people know about the strange smell that asparagus gives off after it has been, ahem, processed by some humans. Yet other humans aren’t able to smell the odor at all. That makes asparagus an unusual marker for the intricacies of genetic variation.

Source: The Asparagus-Urine Smell Is Surprisingly Controversial

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The Internet Thinks You Can Unspoil Wine With a Penny. Here’s the Truth.

People have leftover wine?

Hey, did you know that you can revive a spoiled wine by just dropping a penny into your glass? Well, at least according to the internet. The truth, though, is much more complicated.

Source: The Internet Thinks You Can Unspoil Wine With a Penny. Here’s the Truth.

For starters, pennies aren’t made with as much copper as they used to…  Copper is a commodity similar to lumber and oil. It’s price has exploded in the last 10 years. It’s this reason why many new construction homes forgo copper plumbing.

Material Made from Industrial Waste and Orange Peel Sucks Mercury Out of Water

Science for solving problems that science created 😉

Mercury in water can damage food and water supplies and in the worst cases even kill. Now, a team of Australian researchers has stumbled across a material made from industrial waste and orange peel that can suck the metal right out of H20.

Source: Material Made from Industrial Waste and Orange Peel Sucks Mercury Out of Water

Looks like Tropicana and other juice companies can start selling off their peels if they haven’t turned them into marmalade.  But there’s rumor that orange peels and pulp are being fed to cattle and chickens to reduce salmonella infections…

Water hyacinth, a weed in just about every water way, also removes mercury and other heavy metals from the water passing through it. The question then is how do you dispose of the metal laden water hyacinth?

So how do you dispose of these freaky red diaphragms once they are contaminated?  Guess we need to make more thermometers?

Getting a Tiny Bit of This Element on Your Skin Will Make You Reek of Garlic for Weeks

Tellurium is usually found stuck to various metals in the ground. It forms ores with gold, silver, copper, and lead. When refining these metals, some unfortunate people have come into contact with purified tellurium—and exposure means you reek of garlic for weeks.

Source: Getting a Tiny Bit of This Element on Your Skin Will Make You Reek of Garlic for Weeks

It’s standard practice to dissolve drug candidates in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) when they are used. If you ever taste garlic, you’re instructed to drop what you’re doing and get to a hospital.  😉

Cooking Garlic the “Wrong” Way Can Make It Turn Blue

People who cook garlic have sometimes been alarmed to see their garlic turn green, blue, or turquoise as it cooked. What the hell happened? Bacterial infestation? Poison added by assassins? Actually, it was just chemistry.

Source: Cooking Garlic the “Wrong” Way Can Make It Turn Blue

Only time I’d be cooking garlic is to make garlic confit (vegan if you use olive oil).  Otherwise, I’ve followed the findings of how garlic is prepared to add garlic at the very end to get better flavour.  Don’t forget that stainless steel can get rid of the garlic smell (but I like it).

No Matter What You Think, Radishes Aren’t Actually Spicy

Radishes may seem spicy — but they’re not. They don’t have any spicy flavor compounds in them, the way chili peppers do. So why do they taste spicy when you bite into them?

Source: No Matter What You Think, Radishes Aren’t Actually Spicy

Radishes do not have a lot of nutritional value.  There is vitamin K in radishes – 1.5 mcg of vitamin K per 116 grams of radishes.  Not a lot, but it can add up if you don’t watch out …assuming you can stand to eat that much.

Stainless Steel: Erases Aroma of Garlic, Onion

If you love cooking with garlic, you know it does a lot of good in recipes by helping build flavor — but its strong odor can linger for hours, especially on our hands. We’ve all been in the situation where after preparing a wonderful meal, we’re left with the stench of garlic on our fingers — yuck! There are a few tricks people often recommend to eliminate the smell: lemon juice or vinegar, rubbing your hands with salt, or even using toothpaste! But those don’t work — all they do is mask the garlic smell. So what does really work? Stainless steel.

Stainless steel, of all things, has been shown to remove the odor of garlic. Kitchen gadget companies have even created stainless steel bars shaped like soap for removing kitchen smells from your hands. But using any stainless steel surface works, too. Try your stainless steel kitchen sink or faucet — just hold your hands under cold running water while rubbing the stainless steel for 10 seconds. Voila, the smell will be gone.

Let’s explain why stainless steel works.

Source: Why Stainless Steel Erases Garlic’s Aroma

It works, but not for the reason the article supplies.  Sulfur does not react with water, even at elevated temperatures.  And sulfuric acid is odorless (provided you don’t consider the burning an odor), and sulfur is also inert with regards to steel. Whoever wrote that doesn’t science very well.

Tips:

  • If you have a stainless steel sink, just rub your hands on that.
  • For fish, wash your hands with spearmint tooth paste.