Make a Foamy, Dairy-Free “Latte” With Xanthan Gum

Why do it?  Latte’s have a very smooth, milky texture. This is sort of a middle-ground.

Thicken Soup with Blended White Beans for a Gluten-Free Alternative

While some broths are destined to remain thin and wispy, other soups taste best when served thick and creamy. But what do you do when it’s too late to add a slurry to a meaty soup? Or you’re gluten-free and must skip flour and bread? Or are vegan and don’t like the idea of butter in your soup?

The answer to all these culinary obstacles lies in white beans. Blended white beans.

Source: Here Is My Favourite Gluten-Free Way to Thicken Soup

Roasted carrots would help thicken too, while sweetening.

For a moment, I thought the recipe suggested navy beans – which contain a low dose of vitamin K (1 mcg of vitamin K per cup).  But cannellini beans have:

  • 1 tablespoon/12 grams of white beans contains 0.7 mcg of vitamin K – 1% Daily Value (DV)
  • 1 ounce/28 grams of white beans contains 1.6 mcg of vitamin K – 2% DV
  • 100 grams of white beans contains 5.6 mcg of vitamin K – 7% DV
  • 1 cup/202 grams of white beans contains 11.3 mcg of vitamin K – 14% DV

The example recipe calls for 0.25 cup, so roughly 50 grams.  That’s likely to be around 3 mcg of vitamin K, or 3% DV.  Be aware so you can be careful!

Tips for Thickening Chili

Chili was originally a peasant dish. It was almost always vegetarian because meat is expensive. Beans are a wonderful cheap source of protein. That said wonderful chili can be made, sans beans.

Whatever way you make it, for those times when your chili comes out a bit runny—more like soup than a hearty stew…

The Potato Masher

Unlike some quirky cooking utensils, every kitchen is bound to have a potato masher.  And this does not add any ingredients!  Just mash a little so that the ingredients break down, releasing their natural starches will help thicken the excess liquid.

Masa, Cornmeal, or even Polenta

Add a little water to a couple of tablespoons of masa flour, stir it in at the end of cooking.  As mentioned, cornmeal or polenta would be good substitutes.

Tortilla or Tortilla Chips

It’s common to use these to thicken soups.  Tear or break into small pieces before stirring in.

Blend Bread into a Dressing for an Egg-Free Creamy Texture

Salad can be a great healthy meal, but if you don’t want the calories and fat that come with a heavy dressing, try using bread as a thickening agent. You’ll get a rich, creamy texture without using eggs or mayo to get it. This is especially useful if you’re out of eggs, have an egg allergy, or are a vegan.

You don’t have to change your dressing recipe to make this work—just use bread where you would a thickener like mayo or egg yolk. As you blend the bread with the rest of the ingredients, the dressing will thicken. You can use this as an opportunity to get rid of bread that is getting stale.  Lots of breads do not have egg in them: challah, sourdough, foccacia…  Some, like sourdough, will contribute to flavour.

Another alternative would be: ground flax or chia seeds (1TBSP to 3TBSP water per egg needed, mix until thick) than bread. Easier, lighter, good for people avoiding carbs and gluten.  Egg substitutes have been covered in the past.