This Neolithic Graveyard May Solve Mystery of How Ancient Europe Started Farming

A new archaeological find in Turkey may have just answered a question about our ancestors that has persisted for thousands of years. Ancient farming may look a little less like what we imagined it as, and a little more like what we see today.

Source: This Neolithic Graveyard May Solve Mystery of How Ancient Europe Started Farming

Ah, life before Monsanto…

Why Did the Turkey Stop Being Sacred?

When you’re starving, anything tastes good.

Not long ago, archaeologists excavating a thousand-year-old Native American village near Dove Creek, Colorado, found a mass grave of turkeys, containing the remains of more than 50 birds, young and old. This wasn’t a cache of bones leftover from turkey dinners. Instead, the carcasses had been carefully arranged within a circle of stones and buried in the floor of a small structure.

Archaeologists say the ceremonial burial, found in 2012, is a striking reminder of a time when many North Americans valued the turkey as a sacred being, not a special holiday meal.

Source: We used to revere turkeys, not eat them

Maybe it was around the time long range weapons were developed, so the Puebloan peoples no longer had to risk life and limb getting close to those vicious terror birds.  Wild turkeys are ugly, little feathered Velociraptors

Freeze Cranberry Sauce and Gravy for The Best Thanksgiving Croissants Possible

Making Thanksgiving croissants is a three-day process. I started making the compound butter two days ago. I paddled together butter and Thanksgiving spices: dried sage, dried thyme, granulated onion, onion powder, salt, sugar, pepper, and a little turmeric for color. We developed the recipe from looking at the ingredient list for Stovetop stuffing.

Source: How to Make Thanksgiving Croissants

Lots assume that there will be a lot of leftover gravy. In my experience, gravy always runs out long before the turkey does, and I often have to cobble together substitutes for that first yummy batch with the meat dripping and carving juices.  So if you run out:

Roast and then simmer the giblets with veggies to get some flavorful broth to add to the pan drippings. Start with a (I know, it’s horrible) store-bought stock, dissolve flour or cornstarch in water, add it to the boiling stock, then add the giblet stock and pan drippings. If you use decent quality store stock, you won’t notice the difference and you can make half a gallon of gravy.  Or buy a couple of turkey thighs or legs and roast them a few days ahead and store the deglazed pan drippings in the freezer until the big day.

All The Food Safety Questions You’ll Have On Thanksgiving Day, Answered

Family disagreements at Thanksgiving aren’t limited to politics at the dinner table: if you’ve ever stood in the kitchen arguing with your grandma about whether the turkey is done, you know what we mean. So we asked food safety expert Ben Chapman to settle your most likely disputes.

Source: All The Food Safety Questions You’ll Have On Thanksgiving Day, Answered

The US government is now posting warnings advising against cooking the stuffing inside the bird, since the correct cooking time for the turkey is not long enough to ensure that the stuffing is cooked enough to be safe.  Stuff the bird after cooking to get that extra flavour boost without the food safety worries because the turkey meat tends to hit the appropriate temperature before the stuffing does.

Five Useful Cooking Techniques No One Teaches You

Most of us learn to cook through trial and error, the Food Network, or being forced to feed ourselves when no one else will do it. So naturally, no one’s born knowing how to sauté chicken, or blanch vegetables. Here are some basic (but useful) cooking techniques chefs use every day, but the rest of us rarely pick up.

Source: Five Useful Cooking Techniques No One Teaches You

#6: Sous vide 101.  How much did you know already?  Alton Brown’s “Good Eats” is a good show – last I heard, most was available on Netflix.

This Video Explains What Can (and Can’t) Affect Your Metabolism

The only strictly genetic component to an “increased” metabolism is the amount of “Uncoupling Protein” you have on the inner cell membrane of your mitochondria. The more of this protein you have, the less efficient your body is at turning calories into energy so to speak. The calories are just turned into heat energy. This requires more calories to support body function.

A high concentration of these mitochondria with a high levels of UCP are located within what’s called brown fat. This brown fat is strictly used to generate and maintain body heat. The amount of brown fat that you have decreases with age, contributing to 90 y/o men wearing cardigans in the summer and a slower “metabolism.”

Also, the “eat smaller meals more frequently” is actually a fallacy. Much like “always eat breakfast,” it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Healthy people hear it’s healthy, attach themselves to the habit, and it becomes consequentially associated with health.

Study Finds 20 Percent of Ground Meat Isn’t What It Says On the Label

Once it’s been processed and pulped, most red meat looks more or less the same. This seems to be helping unscrupulous meat suppliers: according to a new survey, 20% of ground meat contains more than what’s just on the label.

Correction: A previous version of this article mistakenly said that ground beef was one of the mis-labelled products; in fact, all the beef products testing in this study were found to be 100% beef.

Source: Study Finds 20 Percent of Ground Meat Isn’t What It Says On the Label

The horse you hate is better than no horse at all? 😉 😀

Why is a Compound That Smells Like Feces Put in Perfume And Chocolate?

I told you my poop smelled like roses. 😀

You’ve undoubtedly smelled indole. Perfumers add it to flowery fragrances, but it’s also added to chocolates, coffees, and fruity-flavored sweets. That doesn’t sound bad—until you learn that concentrated indole smells like poop. Because it’s actually found in poop.

Source: Why is a Compound That Smells Like Feces Put in Perfume And Chocolate?

Actually, this stuff is only added to American chocolate, (Indole 3 – Butyric Acid) and yes, most non-Americans can tell and wonder why you eat chocolate that smells like vomit and tastes worse.

The World’s Most Carcinogenic Toxin Was Discovered Via Turkey Plague

It was May of 1960 when turkeys in England started dying of a mysterious disease. By August, over 100,000 were dead — in some places, the mortality rate was 100%. Although pheasants and ducklings were also susceptible, turkey populations seemed most vulnerable, and so the plague got the name Turkey X Disease.

Source: The World’s Most Carcinogenic Toxin Was Discovered Via Turkey Plague

Fun fact! Aflatoxin isn’t inherently dangerous, in and of it itself. The compound has to first be activated by enzymes in your liver before it has carcinogenic action, resulting in inter-individual differences in susceptibility. Also, because the active compound is made in the liver, that’s where it does the most damage, aka liver damage and liver cancer. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is the most dangerous to humans, and if I recall correctly may be because it is more easily activated by human enzymes.

Why It’s Sometimes Okay to Eat Chicken That’s Pink After Cooking

Here’s the situation: your thermometer reads 165°, but that meat still looks pretty darn pink. What do you do? According to the USDA, looks can be deceiving.

Source: Chicken Still Pink After Cooking?  Don’t Panic

YYYYYEEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!

Just eat it and let’s not be… chicken.