Just One Fix: How to Know When You Actually Need Antibiotics

Antibiotics are strong medicines that can kill bacteria. But we have overused antibiotics for many years. As a result, we now have bacteria that resist antibiotics. Resistant bacteria cause infections that are harder to cure and more costly to treat.

Antibiotic-resistant infections can strike anyone. They can be passed on to others. For example, more and more healthy young people are getting skin infections from MRSA, a bacteria that resists many common antibiotics. MRSA is spreading in households, daycare, schools, camps, dorms, gyms, team sports, and the military.

Try to protect yourself and your loved ones. Here’s what you need to know to help prevent resistance:

Source: Antibiotics: When you need them—and when you don’t

The CDC provides similar information for adults, but more detail.  Reducing antibiotic prescribing is something that requires awareness from both doctors and patients.

No, it's not a tumour!

Maybe it’s a tumour?

Can E. Coli in Supermarket Meat Cause UTIs?

The research has not been peer reviewed.

After testing more than 1,200 samples from Flagstaff-area infections, Price says he’s genetically linked more than 100 of them to supermarket meats. A quarter of those were resistant to several antibiotics.

Source: Can E. Coli in Supermarket Meat Cause UTIs?

 

Cranberries: How They Get to Your Table

…cranberries, a native North American fruit, “magical,” but he easily talks up a lot of their “neat qualities.”

The health benefits of the berries rich in antioxidants have been well-known for years, and range from anti-inflammatory properties to the ability to help fight urinary tract infections and, some believe, cancer.

The physical structure of cranberries is also a boon for the way they are harvested in bogs or marshes that have been flooded.

Source: Cranberries: How this tangy treat gets to your Thanksgiving table

Did you know that Canada & the US account for 98% of global cranberry production?

In addition to being suited to growing in marsh/bog areas, water harvesting is believed to produce cranberries that are better for us:

If berries floating on top of water get exposed to increased amounts of natural sunlight (in comparison to other growing and harvesting conditions), they are likely to develop greater concentrations of anthocyanins. These greater concentrations of anthocyanins are likely to provide us with stronger health benefits.

Caveat: There’s concern for warfarin/coumadin and cranberry juice – be careful, consult your doctor and/or monitor your levels to see if it’s a concern for you.